Angola

No Data

Immigration detainees

Not Available

Detained children

2017

39,865

Refugees

2018

669,479

International migrants

2019

32,900,000

Population

2020

Overview

Angola has vigorously pursued a policy of expelling undocumented migrants for “national security” reasons, claiming that there are more than half a million people in the country illegally who are part of a “silent invasion.” The country has opened several dedicated immigration facilities, where thousands of non-nationals are detained every year to await removal, often in extremely degrading and violent conditions.

Types of facilities used for migration-related detention
Administrative Ad Hoc Criminal Unknown

14 August 2020

A Dormitory inside the Trinta Detention Centre for Foreigners, east of Luanda, (France 24,
A Dormitory inside the Trinta Detention Centre for Foreigners, east of Luanda, (France 24, "C'est une Prison: Le Cri d'Alarme d'un Rwandais dans un Centre pour Etrangers en Angola," 8 May 2019, https://observers.france24.com/fr/20190508-angola-prison-centre-detention-etrangers-rwandais)

According to UNHCR, as of mid-2020 there were 80,698 refugees and asylum seekers in the country. Angola had 1,762 cases of COVID-19 as of 13 August, however there is little information about whether infections have been detected among the country’s refugee population. In late May, after a 60-day state of emergency, the government began loosening some public restrictions as part of a “State of Calamity” declaration. The country has subsequently experienced a sharp rise in cases, going from less than 100 cases in May to nearly 2,000 by August.

There appears to have been no public announcement about specific measures to protect asylum seekers and migrants, including those in detention centres. In the past, the GDP has identified various facilities that appear to be used largely for detaining migrants, asylum seekers, or other foreigners as part of immigration enforcement measures. However, the most recent reports about these centres date back several years. In 2017, the UNHCR reported that it was blocked from visiting detention centres. That same year, the Special Rapporteur on the Human Rights of Migrants released a report denouncing the conditions and length of detention in the facilities.

The country has announced measures taken in prisons. As part of the state of emergency put in place in late March, the country temporarily suspended prison visits. On 5 May, after Angola had released some 1,900 people from pre-trial detention, Human Rights Watch denounced what it regarded as insufficient measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in prisons. While on the one hand, measures were taken to reduce the overcrowding in penitentiary facilities, on the other, individuals were arrested and detained (around 300 people as of 1 May) for violating state of emergency rules. HRW called out the government for continuing to detain “hundreds of people in custody for low-level crimes, leading to a daily influx of new detainees. If not appropriately quarantined and monitored for Covid-19, these new arrivals could contribute to an outbreak in the prison system that prison authorities are ill-equipped to treat.” In a 11 August monthly report, the police said that more than 4,100 people had been detained in the past month.


Last updated: June 2016

Angola Immigration Detention Profile

Last Updated: June 2016

 

INTRODUCTION

Since the end of its three-decades-long civil war in the early 2000s, Angola has pursued a policy of expelling undocumented migrants for “national security” reasons. To assist this effort, the country has opened several dedicated immigration facilities, where thousands of non-nationals are detained every year to await removal, often in extremely degrading and violent conditions.[1] Authorities have also worked to ramp up fear of foreigners, claiming that there are more than half a million people in the country illegally who are part of a “silent invasion.”[2]

Many migrants living in Angola, especially Muslims from West Africa, have been subject to repeated attacks and arbitrary arrests linked to ethnic and religious discrimination. In 2012, Human Rights Watch reported on human rights violations by Angolan authorities against migrants in custody and during expulsion proceedings.[3] Several sources have claimed that security forces abuse irregular migrants, mostly in the border region shared with the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC).[4][5]

In 2013, the UN Human Rights Committee and the Committee on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination Against Women reported on abuses suffered by foreigners in Angola.[6] In 2012, the Special Rapporteur on the human rights of migrants sent a communication concerning alleged mass deportations of migrants and serious violations of their human rights during expulsion. He also reported the deaths of four people who had been detained by Angolan authorities while awaiting deportation.[7] In 2014, the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights stated that Angola “had a right to deport irregular migrants, but must do so humanely and in full compliance with international human rights laws and standards.”[8]

 

LAWS, POLICIES, PRACTICES

Angola adopted the Law Regulating the Legal Status of Foreigners in 2007, which was last amended in 2011.[9] The Foreigners Law provides a legal framework for immigration control including grounds for immigration-related detention. The Angolan Constitution also contains relevant provisions—including on the freedom of internal movement, foreign travel, emigration, and repatriation—although the government has at times restricted these constitutional rights.[10]

Under the Foreigners Law, detention is compulsory when foreign nationals are denied entry (Art. 18-19) or when they are subject to judicial expulsion after being found to be undocumented or present illegally in national territory (Art.104).[11] In both cases, irregular migrants are detained prior to their removal from Angola to their country of origin or of habitual residence. This expulsion includes a period of not less than five years during which the foreign is banned from re- entering national territory.[12]

Alternatively, the Expatriate and Migration Services (SME), under the Interior Ministry’s authority, can notify foreign nationals in an irregular situation to leave Angolan territory within eight days.[13] If they are found on the territory after this period has ended, they can be detained prior to removal.

The Foreigners Law contains provisions for the judicial review of expulsion decisions.[14] Appeals against decisions of the SME are brought before the Ministry of the Interior. However, the possibility for judicial review is restricted as the administration of justice is concentrated in the Interior Ministry only and judges are not involved in verifying the lawfulness of detention. In 2013, the UN Human Rights Committee expressed concern that undocumented migrants may be subjected to detention without recourse to a court to pronounce on the legality of the detention. Consequently, migrants are often arrested arbitrarily and denied due process to challenge their deportation.[15]

The time limit for enforcement of an expulsion order is 15 days for resident foreigners and eight days for non-residents.[16] This time limit must correspond to the maximum length of detention. However, thousand cases where reported by non-governmental sources in which authorities kept immigrants in detention for periods exceeding those provided by law without charges or trial.[17]

The Foreigners Law empowers the SME to enforce immigration law. The SME is the central executive body of the Interior Ministry responsible for promoting and coordinating the actions relating to access, control, transit, stay, detention and exit of foreigners. It operates all immigration detention facilities except Temporary Stay Centres managed by airport operators and run in accordance with regulations to be approved by the Ministers of the Interior and Transports.[18] Border security and the expulsion procedures are under the responsibility of the Angolan Armed Forces (FAA).[19]

Angolan authorities launch massive crackdowns on immigrants several times a year, which lead to the arrest and expulsion of hundreds and sometimes thousands of people. According to press accounts, the SME has claimed that authorities expel more than a thousand migrants a week and that there are more than half a million undocumented migrants in the country.[20] According to the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs, there were only 106,800 international migrants in the country as of 2015, which represent 0.4 percent of its population.[21]

Non-governmental sources report that vulnerable migrants—including asylum-seekers, pregnant women and minors—are placed in administrative immigration detention.[22] During a 2014 session of the UN Universal Periodic Review, the Committee on the Rights of the Child raised concerns about the deportation of more than 30,000 children from Angola.[23] Also, while the country is a party to the 1951 Convention on the Status of Refugees and the 1967 Protocol, the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) has reported the systematic detention of asylum-seekers without any consideration of alternatives measures.[24]

A new law on Asylum and Refugee Status, which entered into force in June 2015, provides specific procedures for the submission of an asylum application and establishes the creation of reception centres for asylum-seekers.[25] The Foreigners Law also provides safeguards against the expulsion of refugees to countries “where they may be persecuted for political, racial or religious reasons, or where their lives may be in danger.”[26]

Angolan authorities criminalise the entry or residence of any person who illegally on national territory. Irregular entry and stay can be punishable by fines of up to 1,500 USD.[27]

 

DETENTION INFRASTRUCTURE

It is not clear how many or what types of facilities Angola operates for the purposes of immigration-related detention. Since 2012, the increased number of expulsions has encouraged Angolan security forces and the SME to use temporary detention facilities exclusively for migrants.[28] In 2015, non-governmental sources reported the presence of seven detention or transit centres dedicated to irregular migrants in various parts of the country.[29]

The main detention centre dedicated for non-nationals found undocumented on national territory is the “Illegal Foreigners Detention Centre,” which opened in 2011 in Viana, not far from the Angolan capital Luanda. The facility has a reported capacity of 800 with separate facilities for men and women.

The Trinita Detention Centre is also dedicated for immigration-related detention. This facility was used in 2014 to detain hundreds of non-Angolan people who were arrested in the streets of Luanda in December 2014. Governmental sources reported that 2,161 people were stopped by the police in one week, and 884 who did not have proper documentation were arrested and detained at the Trinita Detention Centre. These massive crackdowns were condemned by human rights’ organizations who urged Angolan authorities to put an end to the repeated stigmatization and violations of human rights, especially against people from West Africa.[30]

Foreigners who are denied entry can be “accommodated” at the Temporary Stay Centre at the Luanda airport as they await flights. These detainees face a high risk of refoulement as they are not guaranteed international protection procedures.[31]

The press has also reported the use of police stations to confine irregular migrants prior to removal.[32]

Numerous concerns have been raised concerning detention conditions and the mistreatment of migrants while in custody. Detainees at the Illegal Foreigners Detention Centre in Viana have suffered from a lack of sufficient water supply as well as poor diet.[33] NGOs have also stated that foreigners have been denied contact with the outside world, including legal assistance. The same conditions were found in Trinita Detention Centre, where detainees are reportedly kept in cruel, inhumane and degrading conditions. Acts of torture and extortion of money have also been reported.[34]

Non-governmental sources reported improvements concerning the access to detention centres in Angola. The International Committee of the Red Cross is entitled to carry visits to migrants in detention to monitor their treatments and living conditions.[35] In 2013, the SME also agreed to allow UNHCR to have regular access to these facilities. Visits began in 2014, and UNHCR was able to meet with 26 detained asylum seekers during that year.[36]

 

 

[1] FIDH, “Angola: Thousands of African nationals suffer serious human rights’ violation”, Press Release published on December, 26th 2014. https://www.fidh.org/en/region/Africa/angola/angola-thousands-of-african-nationals-suffer-serious-human-rights

[2] RedeAngola, “More than half a million illegal immigrants in the country”, Independent Newspaper, June 2015. http://www.redeangola.info/mais-de-meio-milhao-de-imigrantes-ilegais-no-pais/

[3] Human Rights Watch, “Angola: Stop Rape, Abuse of Congolese Migrants”, May 21st, 2012. https://www.hrw.org/news/2012/05/21/angola-stop-rape-abuse-congolese-migrants

[4] Human Rights Watch, “Sexual Violence and other Abuses against Congolese Migrants during Expulsions from Angola”. Published in May 2012. https://www.hrw.org/report/2012/05/20/if-you-come-back-we-will-kill-you/sexual-violence-and-other-abuses-against

[5] United States Department of State, 2014 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices - Angola, 25 June 2015, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/559bd58612.html

[6] CEDAW, Concluding observations on the sixth periodic report of Angola adopted by the Committee at its fifty fourth session (11 February – 1 March 2013). Published in March 2013. http://docstore.ohchr.org/SelfServices/FilesHandler.ashx?enc=6QkG1d%2fPPRiCAqhKb7yhsgcjdm0xgERNaIXh22nhTUl1LBTO%2f%2bb9UThVCaNsXxMeYhezGPw0XinE%2fRvZ7Il%2fTyX%2f%2fC15yrlzSutPQOoRk2hKMDEVbGw6ROB0X5Ck%2f5RK

[7] Special Rapporteur on the human rights of migrants, Communications Report of Special Procedures: Communications sent, 16 March to 31 May 2012; Replies received, 16 May to 31 July 2012. Published in 2014 prior to the UPR 20th session in the Compilation prepared by the OHCHR. https://documents-dds-ny.un.org/doc/UNDOC/GEN/G14/139/84/PDF/G1413984.pdf?OpenElement

[8]OHCHR, High Commissioner’s statement, Universal Periodic Review: Angola, August 2014, http://www.upr-info.org/sites/default/files/document/angola/session_20_-_october_2014/a_hrc_wg.6_20_ago_2_e.pdf

[9] Law Regulating the Legal Status of Foreigners in the Republic of Angola, Law No. 2/07 of 31 May, entered into force in November 2007. http://www.sme.ao/attachments/article/234/Law%20No.%202-07%20of%2031%20May.pdf

[10] United States Department of State, 2015 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices - Angola, 13 April 2016, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/571612a715.html

[11] Law Regulating the Legal Status of Foreigners in the Republic of Angola, Law No. 2/07 of 31 May, entered into force in November 2007. http://www.sme.ao/attachments/article/234/Law%20No.%202-07%20of%2031%20May.pdf

[12] Article 32 “Expulsion Order”, Law Regulating the Legal Status of Foreigners in the Republic of Angola, Law No. 2/07 of 31 May, entered into force in November 2007. http://www.sme.ao/attachments/article/234/Law%20No.%202-07%20of%2031%20May.pdf

[13] Article 27, Law Regulating the Legal Status of Foreigners in the Republic of Angola, Law No. 2/07 of 31 May, entered into force in November 2007. http://www.sme.ao/attachments/article/234/Law%20No.%202-07%20of%2031%20May.pdf

[14] Article 38, Law Regulating the Legal Status of Foreigners in the Republic of Angola, Law No. 2/07 of 31 May, entered into force in November 2007. http://www.sme.ao/attachments/article/234/Law%20No.%202-07%20of%2031%20May.pdf

[15] Human Rights Watch, “Sexual Violence and other Abuses against Congolese Migrants during Expulsions from Angola”. Published in May 2012. https://www.hrw.org/report/2012/05/20/if-you-come-back-we-will-kill-you/sexual-violence-and-other-abuses-against

[16]Article 32 “Expulsion Order”, Law Regulating the Legal Status of Foreigners in the Republic of Angola, Law No. 2/07 of 31 May, entered into force in November 2007. http://www.sme.ao/attachments/article/234/Law%20No.%202-07%20of%2031%20May.pdf

[17] France 24, “Immigrants run for cover as Angola rounds up hundreds’”, 12 December 2014. http://observers.france24.com/en/20141223-arrests-foreigners-angola-luanda-prison

[18] Articles 21 and 33, Law Regulating the Legal Status of Foreigners in the Republic of Angola, Law No. 2/07 of 31 May, entered into force in November 2007. http://www.sme.ao/attachments/article/234/Law%20No.%202-07%20of%2031%20May.pdf

[19] United States Department of State, 2015 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices - Angola, 13 April 2016, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/571612a715.html

[20] RedeAngola, “More than half a million illegal immigrants in the country”, Independent Newspaper, June 2015. http://www.redeangola.info/mais-de-meio-milhao-de-imigrantes-ilegais-no-pais/

[21] United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division (2015). Trends in International Migrant Stock: The 2015 Revision (United Nations database, POP/DB/MIG/Stock/ Rev.2015). See www.unmigration.org

[22] UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), Submission by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) For the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights' Compilation Report – Universal Periodic Review: Angola, March 2014, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/5541d7954.html

[23] Committee on the Rights of the Child, Submission by the CRC For the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights' Compilation Report – Universal Periodic Review: Angola, CRC/C/AGO/CO/2-4, para. 63., August 2014. http://www.upr-info.org/sites/default/files/document/angola/session_20_-_october_2014/a_hrc_wg.6_20_ago_2_e.pdf

[24] UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), Submission by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) For the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights' Compilation Report – Universal Periodic Review: Angola, March 2014, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/5541d7954.html

[25] Angolan Parliament, Law 10/2015 on Asylum and Refugees Status. Entered into force on June 17th, 2015.

[26] Article 29, Law Regulating the Legal Status of Foreigners in the Republic of Angola, Law No. 2/07 of 31 May, entered into force in November 2007. http://www.sme.ao/attachments/article/234/Law%20No.%202-07%20of%2031%20May.pdf

[27] Article 104, Law Regulating the Legal Status of Foreigners in the Republic of Angola, Law No. 2/07 of 31 May, entered into force in November 2007. http://www.sme.ao/attachments/article/234/Law%20No.%202-07%20of%2031%20May.pdf

[28] Human Rights Watch, “Sexual Violence and other Abuses against Congolese Migrants during Expulsions from Angola”. Published in May 2012. https://www.hrw.org/report/2012/05/20/if-you-come-back-we-will-kill-you/sexual-violence-and-other-abuses-against

[29] United States Department of State, 2015 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices - Angola, 13 April 2016, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/571612a715.html

[30] FIDH, “Angola: Thousands of African nationals suffer serious human rights’ violation”, Press Release published on December, 26th 2014. https://www.fidh.org/en/region/Africa/angola/angola-thousands-of-african-nationals-suffer-serious-human-rights

[31] UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), Submission by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) For the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights' Compilation Report – Universal Periodic Review: Angola, March 2014, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/5541d7954.html

[32] Angola Press Agency, “Angola: Over 100 illegal immigrants detained in Lunda Norte Province”, July 1st 2015. http://allafrica.com/stories/201507010642.html

[33] UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), Submission by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) For the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights' Compilation Report – Universal Periodic Review: Angola, March 2014, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/5541d7954.html

[34] FIDH, “Angola: Thousands of African nationals suffer serious human rights’ violation”, Press Release published on December, 26th 2014. https://www.fidh.org/en/region/Africa/angola/angola-thousands-of-african-nationals-suffer-serious-human-rights

[35]International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), Annual Report 2014 - Yaounde (regional), 9 June 2015. http://www.refworld.org/docid/558131b042.html

[36] UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), Submission by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) For the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights' Compilation Report – Universal Periodic Review: Angola, March 2014, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/5541d7954.html

IMMIGRATION AND DETENTION-RELATED STATISTICS

Total number of detained minors
Not Available
2017
Criminal prison population
24,165
2015
21,634
2013
19,898
2011
16,183
2009
8,300
2005
4,975
2002
5,147
1999
Prison population rate (per 100,000 of national population)
96
2015
105
2013
100
2011
87
2009
50
2005
33
2002
39
1999
Population
32,900,000
2020
25,022,000
2015
20,200,000
2012
International migrants
669,479
2019
106,800
2015
87,400
2013
International migrants as a percentage of the population
0.4
2013
Refugees
39,865
2018
41,127
2017
15,537
2016
15,555
2015
23,783
2014
Ratio of refugees per 1000 inhabitants
0.6
2016
0.64
2014
1.2
2012
Total number of new asylum applications
12,270
2014
Stateless persons
0
2016
0
2014
Total number of immigration detainees by year
Number of immigration detainees on a given day
Top nationalities of detainees
Number of persons granted alternatives to immigration detention
Number of detained asylum seekers
Number of detained unaccompanied minors
Number of detained accompanied minors
Number of detained stateless persons
Number of apprehensions of non-citizens
Immigration detainees as a percentage of total international migrant population
Estimated total immigration detention capacity
Number of dedicated long-term immigration detention centres
Estimated capacity of dedicated long-term immigration detention centres
Number of dedicated medium-term immigration detention centres
Number of immigration offices
Number of transit facilities
Number of criminal facilities
Number of ad hoc facilities
Number of persons removed/returned (voluntary returns and deportations)
Number of deportations/forced returns only
Percentage of persons removed in relation to total number of people placed in removal procedures
Percentage of foreign prisoners
Estimated number of undocumented migrants
Refugee recognition rate

SOCIO-ECONOMIC INDICATORS

Gross Domestic Product per capita (in USD)
5,668
2013
Remittances to the country
18
2010
Remittances from the country
714
2010
Unemployment Rate
2014
Net official development assistance (ODA) (in millions USD)
231.3
2014
Human Development Index Ranking (UNDP)
149 (Low)
2014
Unemployment rate amongst migrants
Detention for deterrence
Pew Global Attitudes Poll on Immigration
Immigration Index Score
World Bank Rule of Law Index
Domestic Opinion Polls on Immigration

DOMESTIC LAWS AND POLICIES

Legal tradition
Common law
Constitutional guarantees?
Yes (Constitution of the Republic of Angola Article 63: "Any person deprived of their liberty must be informed at the time of their imprisonment or detention of the respective reasons and their rights" Article 67: "No-one may be detained, imprisoned or brought to trial unless under the terms of the law, and all defendants or prisoners shall be guaranteed the right to a defence, appeal and legal counsel") 2010 2010
2010
Core pieces of national legislation
Law Regulating the Legal Status of Foreigners in the Republic of Angola, Law No. 2/07 of 31 May, entered into force in November 2007. (2007) 2007
2007
Immigration-status-related grounds
Detention for unauthorised entry or stay
2016
Detention to effect removal
2016
Detention for failing to respect a voluntary removal order
2016
Does the country provide specific criminal penalties for immigration-related violations?
Yes (No)
2016
Maximum length for administrative immigration detention in law.
15
2016
Is the detention of vulnerable persons provided in law? Are they detained in practice?
Asylum seekers (Not mentioned) Yes
2014
Pregnant women (Not mentioned) Yes
2014
Accompanied minors (Not mentioned) Yes
2014
Unaccompanied minors (Not mentioned) Yes
2014
Mandatory detention
Yes (All apprehended non-citizens who do not have proper documentation)
2016
Yes (Non-citizens who have been placed in removal proceedings)
2016
Re-entry ban
Yes
2016
Additional legislation
Regulations, standards, guidelines
Non-immigration-status-related grounds providing for administrative detention in immigration legislation.
Grounds for criminal immigration-related detention/incarceration and maximum potential duration of incarceration
Has the country decriminalized immigration-related violations?
Longest recorded instance of immigration detention.
Maximum length of time in custody prior to issuance of a detention order
Average length of detention
Maximum length of detention for asylum-seekers
Maximum length of detention for persons detained upon arrival at ports of entry
Provision of basic procedural standards
Types of non-custodial measures
Impact of alternatives
Expedited/fast track removal

INTERNATIONAL LAW

Individual complaints procedure
Acceptance Year
CRPD, Optional Protocol to o the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities 2014
2014
CEDAW, Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women, 1999 2007
2007
ICCPR, First Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, 1966 1992
1992
Ratio of complaints procedures accepted
Observation Date
3/5
3/5
Relevant recommendations issued by treaty bodies
Recommendation Year
Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights 4. The Committee urges the State party to: (a) Ensure the implementation of the law on the right of asylum and refugee status and put in place fair and effective asylum procedures, embracing protection against refoulement; (b) Ensure that detention of asylum seekers and refugees is used only as a last resort and that those detained in reception centres are provided with legal safeguards and have access to legal counsel as well as interpretation services; (c) Establish alternatives to the detention of children and families with children; (d) Issue and renew identification documents for asylum seekers and refugees in a timely manner so as to facilitate their access to basic social services, and prevent their arbitrary detention; (e) Improve the material conditions of reception centres and ensure that asylum seekers staying in these centres are guaranteed an adequate standard of living and enjoy access to basic social services; (f) Introduce the necessary legislative and policy amendments to remove the requirement that asylum seekers must reside in closed reception centres. 2016
2016
Human Rights Committee

§16. [...] ensure that undocumented migrants are protected against refoulement and if detained are entitled to bring proceedings before a court that will decide on the lawfulness of their detention.

2013
2013
Regional legal instruments
Year of Ratification (Treaty) / Transposed (Directive) / Adoption (Regulation)
ACHPR, African Charter on Human and Peoples Rights 1990
1990
ACRWC, African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child 1992
1992
APRW, Protocol to the African Charter on Human and Peoples Rights on the Rights of Women in Africa (Maputo Protocol) 2007
2007
Relevant recommendations of the UN Universal Periodic Review
Observation Date
Yes 2010
2017
No 2014
Ratio of relevant international treaties ratified
International treaty reservations
Treaty bodies decisions on individual complaints
Regional treaty reservations
Regional judicial decisions on individual complaints
Recommendations issued by regional human rights mechanisms
Bilateral/multilateral agreements linked to readmission
Visits by special procedures of the Human Rights Council
Relevant recommendations by UN Special Procedures

INSTITUTIONAL INDICATORS

Custodial authority
(Service for Migration and Foreigners)
2011
(Service for Migration and Foreigners)
2008
(Service for Migration and Foreigners)
2008
Detention Facility Management
Service for Migration and Foreigners (Governmental)
2011
Service for Migration and Foreigners (Governmental)
2008
Types of detention facilities used in practice
()
2015
()
2015
Authorized monitoring institutions
National Ombudsman (Provedor di Justiça di direitos) (National Human Rights Institution (or Ombudsperson) (NHRI))
2016
Does NHRI carry out visits?
Yes
2014
Does NHRI have capacity to receive complaints?
Yes
2014
Federal or centralized governing system
Centralized or decentralized immigration authority
Apprehending authorities
Formally designated detention estate?
Is the national human rights institution (NHRI) recognized as independent?
Does NHRI publicly release reports on immigration detention?
Does national preventive mechanism (NPM) carry out visits?
Does NPM have capacity to receive complaints?
Does NPM publicly release reports on immigration detention?
Do NGOs carry out visits?
NGO capacity to receive complaints?
Do NGOs publish reports on immigration detention?
Do parliamentary organs carry out visits?
Do parliamentary organs have capacity to receive complaints?
Do parliamentary organs publicly report on their detention findings?
Do internal inspection agencies (IIAs) carry out visits?
Do IIAs have capacity to receive complaints?
Do IIAs publicly report their findings from detention inspections?
Do international and/or regional bodies (IRBs) visit immigration-related detention facilities?
Do IRBs publicly report their findings from inspections?
Types of privatisation/outsourcing
Detention contractors and other non-state entities
Estimated annual budget for detention operations
Estimated annual budgets for particular detention-related activities
Estimated cost per detainees day (in USD)
Estimated annual budget for non-custodial measures (in USD)
Estimated costs of non-custodial measures (in USD)
Does the country receive external sources of funding?
Description of foreign assistance