Indonesia

No Data

Immigration detainees

982

Detained children

2017

10,793

Refugees

2018

273,500,000

Population

2020

Overview

Described by the International Organisation for Migration (IOM) as “a key transit country for irregular migrant movements,” Indonesia has dozens of immigration detention facilities, many of which have been denounced for their terrible conditions. The growth of Indonesia’s detention capacities has been largely driven by the policies and practices of Australia, with assistance provided by the IOM.

Types of facilities used for migration-related detention
Administrative Ad Hoc Criminal Unknown

25 June 2020

A Fishing Boat Carrying Dozens of Rohingya Refugees is Rescued in the Waters of North Aceh on 24 June 2020, (Nova Wahyudi, Antara,
A Fishing Boat Carrying Dozens of Rohingya Refugees is Rescued in the Waters of North Aceh on 24 June 2020, (Nova Wahyudi, Antara, "Amnesty Urges Indonesia to Protect Rohingya Stranded in Aceh Waters," The Jakarta Post, 25 June 2020, https://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2020/06/25/amnesty-urges-indonesia-to-protect-rohingya-stranded-in-aceh-waters.html)

Amnesty International reported (24 June) that a boat carrying 94 Rohingya refugees was stranded in waters just off Aceh. In a statement, the rights group urged the Indonesian authorities to ensure the group’s rescue, disembarkation, and protection. As the Executive Director of Amnesty International Indonesia said, “In the time of COVID-19, we urge all countries in the region to ensure the wellbeing of refugees and not to send them back to the sea. Under international law, all countries have the obligation to protect and rescue people at risk of serious harm.” However, the Indonesian government stated that the group would be pushed back once their broken vessel is fixed. In videos shared by the Asia Pacific Refugee RIghts Network (APRRN), locals can be seen demonstrating, urging the Indonesian government to alter its policy and allow the stranded women, children, and men to disembark. Reports subsequently suggested that the local community had helped the group of refugees to land. (Numerous other countries in the Asia-Pacific region have refused to rescue Rohingya boats during the pandemic, including Malaysia and Thailand. See our updates on this platform)

Although Indonesia recognised refugees and asylum seekers as a vulnerable group during the pandemic, authorities have reportedly not conducted any practical actions to protect such communities. According to ARPPN, refugees have not been provided with protective equipment such as masks and hand sanitiser, despite many continuing to live in overcrowded and cramped apartments (see 4 April update). Information about the virus was also not delivered to refugees by the government in a language they could understand—authorities have instead relied upon NGOs to translate and relay crucial health information during the crisis. Undocumented migrants, meanwhile, many of whom have previously faced rejections from hospitals, remain unwilling to access treatment and testing. While the IOM provides some healthcare to non-nationals, this is limited to emergency care only.

Ahead of World Refugee Day on 20 June, activists called on the government to do more to uphold the rights of refugees in the country—particularly given the limited attention that authorities provided to them in their response to the pandemic. Although the country has not signed the 1951 Refugee Convention, according to UNHCR, some 13,534 refugees were registered in the country in May 2020.


04 April 2020

Refugee Women Making Masks for Vulnerable Indonesians, 4 April 2020, (https://www.unhcr.org/id/en/12397-alongside-the-government-of-indonesia-partner-organizations-and-sister-un-agencies-unhcr-ensures-that-refugees-are-not-left-behind-in-covid-19-response.html)
Refugee Women Making Masks for Vulnerable Indonesians, 4 April 2020, (https://www.unhcr.org/id/en/12397-alongside-the-government-of-indonesia-partner-organizations-and-sister-un-agencies-unhcr-ensures-that-refugees-are-not-left-behind-in-covid-19-response.html)

Although immigration detention is no longer emphasized in Indonesia, reports suggest that refugees and asylum seekers in the country face a dire situation as it is impossible to keep any social distance as many share rooms in cramped apartments and those accommodated in IOM-operated sites live in severely overcrowded conditions. In addition, with no “rights to work, travel and use public health services, refugees and asylum seekers are further marginalised and the most vulnerable to the spread of coronavirus.”

On 31 March, according to the Jakarta Post, officials announced that they would begin barring “foreign nationals from transiting through or entering the country … as the government steps up efforts to curb the spread of COVID-19 in the country without heeding growing calls for a complete lockdown to contain the pandemic.”

The GDP has been unable to find any reports indicating whether measures have taken to assist migrants and asylum seekers held in prisons or detention centres. However, the government has begun staking steps in prisons as well as detention centres for minors, including restricting access and visits. On 31 March 2020, the government announced that it would release around 30,000 of its 270,386 prisoners to avoid a possible surge in infections in its overcrowded prisons.

According to a UNHCR-Jakarta 4 April press release, “As per the Government of Indonesia’s protocol, refugees have access to COVID-19 related services, including testing and treatment, provided by the Ministry of Health. Refugee communities throughout the country have been informed of the protocol through various communication channels and actors.” It added: “As a matter of prevention, UNHCR Indonesia is also working closely with partners and the local government to distribute sanitation kits including masks and disinfectants to refugee communities. UNHCR Indonesia provides cash assistance to those most vulnerable and at risk in this current situation to promote improved health and sanitation. With additional funding, UNHCR aims to also expand this cash assistance to more refugee families. Many refugees in Indonesia have skills and resources that can also be part of the solution. Some of the refugee women in Medan, supported by partner Mapanbumi, are producing washable face masks that will be distributed to vulnerable Indonesians and those who continue to work outside their homes in order to support themselves and their families. The refugee women aim to produce 1,000 masks for these groups of people such as becak drivers, street cleaners and the elderly in 18 sub-districts.”


Last updated: January 2016

Indonesia Immigration Detention Profile

Although Indonesia has one of the largest populations in the world—which is spread out over a massive archipelago of thousands of islands—it hosts fewer migrants and refugees than many other countries in Southeast Asia. Foreigners represent only 0.1 percent of its total population.[1] However, the International Organization for Migration (IOM) describes Indonesia as “a key transit country for irregular migrant movements.” In 2013, the country intercepted approximately 9,000 migrants.[2]

As of 2015, Indonesia had a detention estate comprised of 13 long-term immigration detention centres (rudenim or karantina in Indonesian)[3] and 20 temporary detention facilities[4] located in 12 of the 33 provinces of the archipelago, which had a combined capacity of roughly 3,000. Like transit countries in other regions of the world, the growth of Indonesia’s detention capacities has been largely driven by the policies and practices of nearby destination countries, namely those of Australia.[5]

In addition to controversial policies like the “Pacific Solutions” that aim to prevent and deter the arrival of asylum seekers by sea by using extra-territorial (offshore) processing centres, Australia has also signed agreements with Indonesia for increased interception and detention of asylum seekers who apparently seek to make to Australia. Australian NGOs have denounced this “Indonesian Solution,” arguing that their government in effect pays Jakarta “hundreds of millions of dollars to detain and warehouse asylum seekers.”[6]

According to academic research findings, from 2011 to 2013 Australia channeled more than $90 million through the International Organization for Migration (IOM) for programmes in the region, “including the upgrade and refurbishment of existing detention facilities” in Indonesia. During the same period, Australia gave the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) some $12 million for protection activities in the region, including support for resettlement.[7]

Australia claims that it does not directly fund immigration detention in Indonesia and other countries. Rather, it earmarks funds under the opaque wording of “providing care and maintenance to intercepted irregular migrants in Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, and East Timor.”[8] As part of the Management and Care of Irregular Immigrants Project (MCIIP I) launched in 2007, the IOM assisted in the refurbishment of detention centres in Tanjug Pinang (capacity was increased from 100 to 400 people with a surge capacity of 600 people) and Jakarta.[9] Likewise, among the activities included in MCIIP II (2011-12) was “Quarantine Facility Renovation” in Batam, Balikpapan, and Semarang, as well as “Updating of the Standard Operations Procedures and Guidelines for Human Rights in Immigration Detention Centres.”[10]

Law Number 6 of 2011 “Concerning Immigration” provides that foreigners can be placed in immigration detention to prevent unauthorized entry, stay or exit and to effect removal.[11] There is virtually no limit to detention as Article 85 of the law allows detention for up to ten years without judicial review. There is also no legal framework regulating the detention of persons of concern to UNHCR. Nearly 6,000 refugees and asylum seekers were detained in Indonesia in 2014.[12]

Children can be detained under Indonesian immigration law and hundreds of children are detained every year, including unaccompanied children, who are often detained with unrelated adults.[13] The UN Committee on the Rights of the Child has called on Indonesia to “Cease the administrative practice of detaining asylum-seeking and refugee children.”[14] UNHCR and numerous NGOs like Jesuit Refugee Services-Indonesia have pressured the country to end the detention of children and to ensure that alternatives to detention that meet international standards are adopted and implemented.[15]

Overcrowding in detention centres is a recurrent complaint. Conditions at facilities can also vary considerably across the archipelago. In some detention centres, migrants can freely move about while in others detainees remain locked up in cells. Human Rights Watch has described conditions as “appalling” and denounced the lack of basic sanitation and bedding. There have been numerous reports of guards physical violence abusing detainees, including unaccompanied migrant children.[16]

Despite numerous criticisms of Indonesia’s immigration detention practices as well as its role in encouraging detention in the country, the Australian government has argued that “standards of health, hygiene, human rights and security in Indonesian detention facilities are matters for the Indonesian Government.”[17]

 

[1] Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division, United Nations, Website: http://www.un.org/en/development/desa/population/publications/, United Nations, 2015.

[3] Ophelia Field and Alice Edwards, “Alternatives to Detention of Asylum Seekers and Refugees,” UNHCR, Division of International Projection Services, POLAS/2006/03, April 2006, http://www.unhcr.org/5666a2ea9.pdf .

[4] United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, “Beyond Detention 2014-2019 – National Action Plan Indonesia,” UNHCR, November 2015, http://www.unhcr.org/5666a2ea9.pdf.

[5] Amy Nethery and Rafferty-Brown, Brynna, Taylor, Savitri, "Exporting Detention: Australia-funded Immigration Detention in Indonesia," in Journal of Refugee Studies Vol. 26, No. 1, revised March 2012. http://jrs.oxfordjournals.org/content/26/1/88.abstract; International Organisation for Migration, “Immigration and Border Management,” Factsheet, IOM Indonesia, December 2014. http://www.iom.or.id/sites/default/files/Factsheet%20-%20IBM.pdf. See also, Flynn, Michael, ”How and Why Immigration Detention Crossed the Globe,”

Global Detention Project, Working Paper No. 8. April 2014. http://www.globaldetentionproject.org/publications/working-papers/diffusion.html  

[6] Refugee Action Coalition fact sheet. The Indonesian Solution. December 2009. http://www.refugeeaction.org.au/?page_id=51

[7] Amy Nethery, Brynna Rafferty-Brown, and Savitri Taylor, "At the discretion of management - Immigration detention in Indonesia," in Immigration Detention - The migration of a policy and its human impact, Nethery and Silverman (eds), 2015; Australian Immigration Department, “Answer to Question Taken on Notice, Additional Estimates Hearings,” 11 February 2013, (AE13/0279); Australian Immigration Department, “Answer to Question Taken on Notice, Budget Estimates Hearings,” 27-28 May 2013, BE13/0316.

[8] Australian Immigration Department, “Answer to Question Taken on Notice, Additional Estimates Hearings,” 11 February 2013, AE13/0279.

[9] Amy Nethery, Brynna Rafferty-Brown, and Savitri Taylor, "Exporting Detention: Australia-funded Immigration Detention in Indonesia," in Journal of Refugee Studies Vol. 26, No. 1, revised March 2012, http://jrs.oxfordjournals.org/content/26/1/88.abstract; International Organisation for Migration, “Immigration and Border Management,” Factsheet, IOM Indonesia, December 2014, http://www.iom.or.id/sites/default/files/Factsheet%20-%20IBM.pdf.  

[10] IOM Indonesia, “Management & Care of Intercepted Irregular Migrants Project – MCIIP 2,”  http://www.iom.or.id/what-we-do/immigration-and-border-management/mciip-2.

[11] Law of the Republic of Indonesia Number 6 of 2011 Concerning Immigration, (Undang-Undang No. 6 tahun 2011 tentang Keimigrasiaan),  http://www.imigrasi.go.id/phocadownloadpap/Undang-Undang/uu%20nomor%206%20tahun%202011%20-%20%20english%20version.pdf.

[12] United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, “Beyond Detention 2014-2019 – National Action Plan Indonesia,” UNHCR, November 2015, http://www.unhcr.org/5666a2ea9.pdf.

[13] Human Rights Watch, “Barely Surviving: Detention, Abuse, Neglect of Migrant Children in Indonesia,” HRW, 24 June 2013, https://www.hrw.org/report/2013/06/23/barely-surviving/detention-abuse-and-neglect-migrant-children-indonesia.

[14] Committee on the Rights of the Child, “Concluding observations on the combined third and fourth periodic reports of Indonesia,” United Nations, CRC/C/IDN/CO/3-4, 10 July 2014, http://uhri.ohchr.org/document/index/4cbccb2b-753b-47f5-8f0e-ab50707146f9.

[15] JRS-Indonesia, Website: Detention, http://jrs.or.id/en/campaign/detention/.

[16] Human Rights Watch, “Barely Surviving: Detention, Abuse, Neglect of Migrant Children in Indonesia,” HRW, 24 June 2013, https://www.hrw.org/report/2013/06/23/barely-surviving/detention-abuse-and-neglect-migrant-children-indonesia.

[17] Amy Nethery, Brynna Rafferty-Brown, and Savitri Taylor, "At the discretion of management - Immigration detention in Indonesia" in Immigration Detention - The migration of a policy and its human impact,  Nethery and Silverman (eds), 2015.

 

IMMIGRATION AND DETENTION-RELATED STATISTICS

Number of detained asylum seekers
2,806
2013
Total number of detained minors
982
2017
1,117
2016
838
2015
Number of dedicated long-term immigration detention centres
13
2015
13
2014
14
2009
Estimated capacity of dedicated long-term immigration detention centres
3,000
2014
1,445
2010
Number of persons removed/returned (voluntary returns and deportations)
10,831
2014
2,011
2013
Criminal prison population
210,682
2017
161,692
2014
154,000
2013
117,863
2010
128,876
2007
87,185
2004
59,488
2001
48,898
1998
41,353
1996
40,915
1992
Percentage of foreign prisoners
0.6
2016
Prison population rate (per 100,000 of national population)
81
2017
64
2014
62
2013
49
2010
55
2007
39
2004
27
2001
24
1998
20
1996
21
1992
Population
273,500,000
2020
255,461,700
2015
International migrants
328,800
2015
295,400
2013
Refugees
10,793
2018
9,795
2017
7,819
2016
5,957
2015
4,270
2014
Ratio of refugees per 1000 inhabitants
0.03
2016
0.02
2014
0.01
2013
0.01
2012
Total number of new asylum applications
3,310
2016
5,658
2014
8,587
2013
7,223
2012
Refugee recognition rate
82.8
2014
89
2013
Stateless persons
0
2016
0
2014
Total number of immigration detainees by year
Number of immigration detainees on a given day
Top nationalities of detainees
Number of persons granted alternatives to immigration detention
Number of detained unaccompanied minors
Number of detained accompanied minors
Number of detained stateless persons
Number of apprehensions of non-citizens
Immigration detainees as a percentage of total international migrant population
Estimated total immigration detention capacity
Number of dedicated medium-term immigration detention centres
Number of immigration offices
Number of transit facilities
Number of criminal facilities
Number of ad hoc facilities
Number of deportations/forced returns only
Percentage of persons removed in relation to total number of people placed in removal procedures
International migrants as a percentage of the population
Estimated number of undocumented migrants

SOCIO-ECONOMIC INDICATORS

Gross Domestic Product per capita (in USD)
3,491
2014
3,475
2013
Remittances to the country
8,551
2014
6,924
2011
Remittances from the country
2,840
2010
Unemployment Rate
2014
Net official development assistance (ODA) (in millions USD)
67,810,000
2012
Human Development Index Ranking (UNDP)
110 (Medium)
2015
108 (Medium)
2014
Detention for deterrence
"UNHCR is concerned that detention continues to be used in a routine manner. This policy is mostly applied to persons intercepted attempting to enter or leave the country in an irregular manner. The continued use of detention as a deterrent to irregular movement and by consequence, to deter the movement of asylum-seekers and refugees, raises concern over the well-being of refugees and asylum-seekers fleeing persecution in their home countries, especially those with particular vulnerabilities including children and women. " UNHCR
Pew Global Attitudes Poll on Immigration
89
2007
Unemployment rate amongst migrants
Immigration Index Score
World Bank Rule of Law Index
Domestic Opinion Polls on Immigration

DOMESTIC LAWS AND POLICIES

Legal tradition
Civil law
Muslim law
Customary law
Constitutional guarantees?
No (The Constitution of the Republic of Indonesia of 1945, as amended. ) 1945 1945
1945
Core pieces of national legislation
Law of the Republic of Indonesia Number 6 of 2011 Concerning Immigration (2011) 2011
2011
Law No. 39 Year 1999 - Concerning Human Rights. Republic of Indonesia. (1999)
1999
Additional legislation
Law no 21, 2007 on the Eradication of the Criminal Act of Trafficking in Persons (2007)
2007
Regulations, standards, guidelines
Regulation from the Director General of Immigration Number F-1002.PR.02.10 Year 2006 concerning Procedures for the Detention of Foreigners (2015)
2015
Government Regulation of the Republic of Indonesia Number 31 of 2013 Concerning Implementing Regulation of Act Number 6 of 2011 Concerning Immigration (2013)
2013
Regulation from the Minister of Law and Human Rights of the Republic Indonesia Number M.05.IL.02.01 Year 2006 about Immigration Detention House. (2006)
2006
Immigration-status-related grounds
Detention for unauthorised exit
2015
Detention to prevent unauthorised entry at the border
2015
Detention for unauthorised entry or stay
2015
Detention to effect removal
2015
Does the country provide specific criminal penalties for immigration-related violations?
Yes (Yes)
2015
Grounds for criminal immigration-related detention/incarceration and maximum potential duration of incarceration
Unauthorized entry (365)
2015
Unauthorized exit (365)
2015
Maximum length for administrative immigration detention in law.
3650
2015
Longest recorded instance of immigration detention.
3650
2014
Maximum length of time in custody prior to issuance of a detention order
30
2015
Provision of basic procedural standards
Information to detainees (Yes) No
2014
Access to consular assistance (Yes)
2014
Access to asylum procedures (Yes) Yes
2014
Complaints mechanism regarding detention conditions (Yes) No
2014
Access to free interpretation services (No)
2014
Compensation for unlawful detention (No) No
2014
Right to legal counsel (Yes) No
2013
Independent review of detention () No
2013
Right to appeal the lawfulness of detention (No) No
2013
Types of non-custodial measures
Release (Yes) infrequently
2014
Is the detention of vulnerable persons provided in law? Are they detained in practice?
Accompanied minors (Provided) Yes
2014
Unaccompanied minors (Provided) Yes
2014
Victims of trafficking (Provided) Yes
2014
Stateless persons (Not mentioned)
2014
Refugees (Not mentioned) Yes
2014
Asylum seekers (Not mentioned) Yes
2014
Non-immigration-status-related grounds providing for administrative detention in immigration legislation.
Has the country decriminalized immigration-related violations?
Average length of detention
Maximum length of detention for asylum-seekers
Maximum length of detention for persons detained upon arrival at ports of entry
Impact of alternatives
Mandatory detention
Expedited/fast track removal
Re-entry ban

INTERNATIONAL LAW

Ratio of complaints procedures accepted
Observation Date
0/8
0/8
Relevant recommendations issued by treaty bodies
Recommendation Year
Committee on the Rights of the Child "66. In the light of its general comment No. 6 (2005) on the treatment of unaccompanied and separated children outside their country of origin, the Committee urges the State party to bring its immigration and asylum legislation into full compliance with the Convention on the Rights of the Child and other relevant international standards. It further urges the State party to take all necessary measures to adequately address the situation of asylum-seeking children, and in particular: (a) Ensure that the best interests of the child are always given primary consideration in all immigration and asylum processes and that unaccompanied asylum-seeking children are provided with adequate guardianship and free legal representation; (b) Cease the administrative practice of detaining asylum-seeking and refugee children; (c) Stipulate strict behavioural rules for guards and officials at detention facilities and ensure that the facilities are regularly assessed by an independent monitoring body; (d) Ensure that, in all circumstances, children are separated from unrelated adults, have access to sufficient food, clean drinking water and sanitation, as well as health care, education and recreation." 2014
2014
Bilateral/multilateral agreements linked to readmission
Year in Force
Observation Date
EU 2014
2014
2014
Visits by special procedures of the Human Rights Council
Year of Visit
Observation Date
Special Rapporteur on the human rights of migrants 2006
2006
2015
Relevant recommendations of the UN Universal Periodic Review
Observation Date
No 2008
2017
No 2012
2017
No 2017
2017
Ratio of relevant international treaties ratified
International treaty reservations
Individual complaints procedure
Treaty bodies decisions on individual complaints
Regional legal instruments
Regional treaty reservations
Regional judicial decisions on individual complaints
Recommendations issued by regional human rights mechanisms
Relevant recommendations by UN Special Procedures

INSTITUTIONAL INDICATORS

Federal or centralized governing system
Centralized system
2015
Centralized or decentralized immigration authority
Centralized immigration authority
2014
Custodial authority
Immigration officers (Ministry of Law and Human Rights) Justice
2014
Directorate General of Immigration (Ministry of Law and Human Rights) Justice
2014
Directorate General of Immigration (Provincial office of the Ministry for Law and Human Rights ) Justice
2014
Directorate General of Immigration (Ministry for Law and Human Rights) Justice
2014
Directorate General of Correction (Ministry of Justice and Human Rights) Justice
2014
Directorate General of Immigration (Provincial office of the Ministry for Law and Human Rights ) Justice
2013
Directorate General of Immigration (Provincial office of the Ministry for Law and Human Rights ) Justice
2012
Bogor Immigration Office (Ministry of Justice and Human Rights) Justice
2007
Directorate General of Immigration (Ministry of Justice and Human Rights) Justice
2007
Directorate General of Immigration (Ministry of Justice and Human Rights) Justice
2006
Directorate General of Immigration (Ministry of Justice and Human Rights) Justice
2005
Directorate General of Immigration (Ministry of Justice and Human Rights) Justice
2004
Directorate General of Immigration (Ministry of Justice and Human Rights) Justice
2002
Detention Facility Management
Directorate of Immigration. Ministry of Law and Human Rights. (Governmental)
2014
Directorate General of Immigration, Provincial office of the Ministry for Law and Human Rights (Governmental)
2014
Directorate General of Immigration, Provincial office of the Ministry for Law and Human Rights (Governmental)
2014
irectorate General of Immigration, Provincial office of the Ministry for Law and Human Rights (Governmental)
2014
Directorate General of Immigration, Ministry for Law and Human Rights (Governmental)
2014
Ministry of Justice and Human Rights. Directorate General of Correction (Governmental)
2014
Directorate General of Immigration, Provincial office of the Ministry for Law and Human Rights (Governmental)
2013
Directorate General of Immigration, Provincial office of the Ministry for Law and Human Rights (Governmental)
2012
International Organization for Migration (International or Regional Organization)
2007
International Organization for Migration (International or Regional Organization)
2007
Immigration division, Regional office of Ministry of Justice and Human Rights (Governmental)
2007
Immigration division, Regional office of Ministry of Justice and Human Rights (Governmental)
2004
International Organization for Migration (International or Regional Organization)
2002
International Organization for Migration (International or Regional Organization)
2002
Formally designated detention estate?
Yes (Dedicated immigration detention facilities)
2014
Types of detention facilities used in practice
Yes (Yes)
2014
Authorized monitoring institutions
United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (International or Regional Bodies (IRBs))
2015
United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (International or Regional Bodies (IRBs))
2014
Jesuit Refugee Service (Non-Governmental Organizations (NGO))
2014
World Relief Indonesia (Non-Governmental Organizations (NGO))
2014
National Human Rights Commission (Komnas HAM) (National Human Rights Institution (or Ombudsperson) (NHRI))
2014
International Organisation for Migration (International or Regional Bodies (IRBs))
2013
Human Rights Watch (Non-Governmental Organizations (NGO))
2013
Is the national human rights institution (NHRI) recognized as independent?
Yes
2015
Does NHRI carry out visits?
Yes
2013
Yes
2012
Yes
2011
Does NHRI publicly release reports on immigration detention?
Yes
2012
Do NGOs carry out visits?
Yes
2014
Do NGOs publish reports on immigration detention?
Yes
2013
Do international and/or regional bodies (IRBs) visit immigration-related detention facilities?
Yes
2014
Estimated annual budget for detention operations
2,817,168 (Yes) Yes Yes
2013
Does the country receive external sources of funding?
Yes
2013
Yes
2012
Yes
2011
Description of foreign assistance
"In 2011-12 and 2012-13 Australia paid 47.9 million [...] and 46 million [...] , respectively, to the IOM. Payments to the IOM are for various activities, including the upgrade and refurbishment of existing detention facilities [in Indonesia]". Nethery, Amy, Ratterty-Brown, Brynna and Taylor, Savitri. "At the discretion of management - Immigration detention in Indonesia" in Immigration Detention - The migration of a policy and its human impact. Nethery, Amy and Silverman Stephanie (eds). 2015.
2015
Apprehending authorities
Does NHRI have capacity to receive complaints?
Does national preventive mechanism (NPM) carry out visits?
Does NPM have capacity to receive complaints?
Does NPM publicly release reports on immigration detention?
NGO capacity to receive complaints?
Do parliamentary organs carry out visits?
Do parliamentary organs have capacity to receive complaints?
Do parliamentary organs publicly report on their detention findings?
Do internal inspection agencies (IIAs) carry out visits?
Do IIAs have capacity to receive complaints?
Do IIAs publicly report their findings from detention inspections?
Do IRBs publicly report their findings from inspections?
Types of privatisation/outsourcing
Detention contractors and other non-state entities
Estimated annual budgets for particular detention-related activities
Estimated cost per detainees day (in USD)
Estimated annual budget for non-custodial measures (in USD)
Estimated costs of non-custodial measures (in USD)