Costa Rica

No Data

Immigration detainees

Not Available

Detained children

2017

4,547

Refugees

2018

5,100,000

Population

2020

Overview

An important transit and destination country, Costa Rica began systemically applying immigration detention in the 1990s in response to migratory pressures from neighboring Nicaragua. The country currently operates two dedicated detention facilities, which have been criticized by national rights bodies for having inadequate sanitary conditions.

Types of facilities used for migration-related detention
Administrative Ad Hoc Criminal Unknown

27 July 2020

Centro de Aprehensión Temporal para Extranjeros en Condición Irregular, in San José, (
Centro de Aprehensión Temporal para Extranjeros en Condición Irregular, in San José, ("Centro de Aprehensión Temporal para Extranjeros en Condición Irregular (CATECI) (previously Centro de Aseguramiento para Extranjeros en Transito)," Global Detention Project, https://www.globaldetentionproject.org/countries/americas/costa-rica/detention-centres/120/centro-de-aprehension-temporal-para-extranjeros-en-condicion-irregular-cateci-previously-centro-de-aseguramiento-para-extranjeros-en-transito)

Responding to the Global Detention Project’s Covid-19 survey, Costa Rica’s immigration authority (Dirección General de Migración y Extranjería) reported that during the Covid-19 crisis, immigration police (Dirección de la Policía Profesional de Migración) put in place distinct measures for non-citizens apprehended for administrative reasons. Instead of extending detention measures during the pandemic, non-citizens were required to periodically report to police stations. Costa Rica’s immigration authority reported that the immigration police orders the administrative apprehension of a non-citizens in cases where their record demonstrates a risk for security and public order, in accordance with the Law on Migration and Aliens N°8764 (Ley General de Migración y Extranjería número 8764), or if it considers that the person will seek to evade a deportation order.

After the declaration of the state of emergency on 16 March, the immigration authority issued various protocols and guidelines endorsed by the Ministry of Health for the prevention and care of Covid-19 cases, adapting spaces for isolation and training police personnel. Also, protocols seeking to prevent outbreaks of the disease were implemented, including the use of hygiene products such as disinfectants, soap, deep cleaning, and taking non-citizens’ temperature systematically. The Dirección General de Migración y Extranjería also reported that the immigration detention centre in San José, Centro de Aprehensión Regional Central de la Policía Profesional de Migración, where non-citizens who have committed administrative offences or those that are to be deported are held, was staffed with healthcare professionals and if persons had any Covid-19 symptoms, they were transferred to the closest health centre.

Regarding deportations, the immigration authority indicated that these were still being conducted despite the pandemic, albeit only by land and consequently, only to Nicaragua and Panama, where authorities continued receiving their nationals. Deportations to other countries have been temporarily suspended while arrangements are being made through diplomatic channels with other countries’ authorities such as El Salvador, Honduras, and Colombia.

Moreover, while the immigration authority’s offices were temporarily closed from 17 March to 17 May 2020, and closure has since been extended, non-citizens that arrive in Costa Rica may nonetheless apply for asylum at a border post. As soon as the person states that they wish to apply for international protection, staff from the Refuge Unit are dispatched to the relevant border post to carry out the process. The applicant then undergoes the same process as any other would, but in an expedited manner. Through an agreement with UNHCR, the applicant is accommodated in a hotel in the area, while the procedure for determining refugee status is carried out.


06 June 2020

Handcuffed Migrant Being Escorted by Immigration Police, (AFP,
Handcuffed Migrant Being Escorted by Immigration Police, (AFP, "Costa Rica Aísla Centro de Detención de Migrantes por Brote de COVID-19," 5 May 2020, https://www.informa-tico.com/5-05-2020/costa-rica-aisla-centro-detencion-migrantes-brote-covid-19)

Responding to the Global Detention Project’s Covid-19 Survey, the UN Human Rights regional office in Panama (ROCA) reported on 1 June that Costa Rica has not established a moratorium on new immigration detention orders and that the country is not contemplating the measure. ROCA also explained that no immigration detainees have been released and that there are no “alternatives to detention” programmes employed in the country. ROCA reported that people are tested for Covid-19 in immigration detention centres.

Regarding expulsions, the UN office said that while these have been temporarily suspended, there is no specific measure prohibiting them in the country.

On 14 May, news reports indicated that four positive cases of Covid-19 had been detected on people returning from Spain, as well as nine others in an immigration detention centre in the country. From 5 May, Costa Rica closed its borders to non-citizens, with the exception of residents and cargo transport personnel. In total, 23 foreign cargo transports have been refused entry into the country.

On 5 May, Costa Rica placed in isolation one of its main immigration detention centres after 12 cases of Covid-19 were discovered within the facility. News reports indicated that the 12 confirmed cases had been contaminated by two persons detained for having entered the country irregularly that were carrying the disease. Authorities did not specify their nationality.

As regards the country’s prisons, no cases of Covid-19 have been reported on part of staff and prisoners.


Last updated: July 2015

Costa Rica Immigration Detention Profile

Costa Rica is a transit country for migrants travelling to the United States and Canada as well as a destination country. In 2013 the migrant population numbered 419,600. This represented 8.6 percent of the country’s total population, the second highest ratio in Latin America, behind Belize (15.3 percent).[1] Approximately 75 percent of non-citizens residing in Costa Rica are from Nicaragua,[2] and the country’s detention practices have historically been linked to the effort to stem Nicaraguan migration.[3]

Based on reports by human rights groups, it appears that detention in Costa Rica began to emerge as a coherent policy apparatus in the late 1990s as large numbers of Nicaraguans began crossing into the country to work as undocumented labourers in farms. According to a 2002 report by the Central American Human Rights Commission (Codehuca), “In June 2000 the General Immigration and Naturalisation Department … processed approximately 155,000 (regularization) requests of which more than 97% were Nicaraguan immigrants. … The large number of immigrants urged the authorities to implement emergency means to control the undocumented immigration, like the incorporation of a hostel for undocumented immigrants in San José in November 1999 and the implementation of temporary retention centres in the northern part of the country. These are meant to facilitate the process of rejection as established in Costa Rican legislation.”[4]

In its 2009 Migration Law (Ley General de Migración y Extranjería N° 8764), Costa Rica formalized provisions concerning deportation and detention. In 2011 the government issued a detailed Migration Control Regulation (Reglamento de Control Migratorio, Decreto Ejecutivo N° 36769), which interprets and clarifies the Migration Law.

Article 5 of the Migration Control Regulation defines administrative immigration detention as a restriction of liberty ordered by the Directorate General of Migration (Dirección General de Migración y Extranjería) for a foreigner who has entered or remained in the country in irregular manner. It states that the period of detention shall be necessary to carry out the administrative procedure of expulsion or regularization of the person’s migratory status.

Article 31(5) of the Migration Law provides the legal framework and establishes basic procedures for carrying out “administrative detention.” According to this article, migration police (Policía Profesional de Migración) may detain a migrant for up to 24 hours to verify his or her migratory status. In “special circumstances” this can be extended based on a decision made by the director of the Directorate General of Migration (Migration Law, article 31(5)(a); Migration Control Regulation, article 20). The Migration Law further provides that if the “migratory infraction” (infracción migratoria) is confirmed and less coercive measures are dismissed, the Directorate General of Migration shall order deportation proceedings (Migration Law, article 31(5)(a)). Once the consulate of the migrant’s country of origin identifies the person, immigration detention shall not exceed 30 days during which deportation should be carried out. Yet, this period can be extended in “exceptional circumstances,” when justified by the Directorate General of Migration (Migration Law, article 31(5)(b)). The maximum period of detention is thus not set out in the legislation. According to some reports, detention can last longer than six months.[5]

Pursuant to article 31(7) of the Migration Law anyone subject to migration proceedings is to be informed of the reasons for his apprehension and have the right to consular assistance, access to a legal adviser paid by him, and linguistic assistance. Under article 194 of the Migration Law, detainees have the right to appeal detention orders to the Migration Administrative Tribunal (Tribunal Administrativo Migratorio) within three days following issuance of an order. The tribunal does not automatically review the legality of detention. Thus, if a detainee does not make an appeal, immigration detention is not reviewed.[6]

According to the Migration Law, detention is an exceptional measure to be used only when less coercive measures are deemed inadequate for the particular case (Migration Law, article 31(5)). It is difficult to assess how often less coercive measures are employed because authorities do not provide any detention-related statistics.[7] The Migration Law lists four non-custodial measures: regular reporting to authorities, bail, deposit of documents, and home detention (Migration Law, article 211). According to the Centro Internacional De Derechos Humanos de Personas Migrantes (CIDEHUM), bail and home detention are only very rarely used.[8]

According to the Migration Control Regulation, the migration police may not keep children in custody. Rather, it is the National Child Welfare Agency (Patronato Nacional de la Infancia) who is charged with their care (Migration Control Regulation, article 20).

In 2013, 1,150 people sought asylum in Costa Rica; 1,170 in 2012.[9] Asylum seekers are generally not detained. They are issued a document stating their status, which protects them from immigration detention.[10] If administrative or penal proceedings related to undocumented stay of an asylum seeker are on-going, they are to be suspended until the person’s asylum application is assessed (Refugees Regulation, article 137).

The country operates one dedicated long-term immigration detention facility, the Centro de Aprehensión Temporal para Extranjeros en Condición Irregular (CATECI), located in the Hatillo neighborhood of San José (prior to the adoption of the Migration Law the centre was known as the Centro de Aseguramiento para Extranjeros en Transito).[11] The Directorate General of Migration has a custodial authority over the detainees and it manages the centre, jointly with the migration police. The CATECI has a capacity of 50 and confines on average 20 migrants at a time.[12] Men and women are kept separately.[13]

The Migration Law provides that the detainees must be kept in conditions that ensure their dignity and take into account specificities related to gender, age, and disability (Migration Law, article 31(5)(c)). However, during a visit in 2013, the Ombudsman and the National Preventive Mechanism noted that the centre did not provide adequate separation of different categories of detainees (according to the country of origin or vulnerability), that the infrastructure was old, and that sanitary conditions were inadequate.[14] In 2014, the Directorate General of Migration presented its plans to open a new detention centre to replace the CATECI.[15]

There is also a short-term detention facility at the Juan Santamaria Airport, located outside San José. It confines people who have attempted to enter the country in an irregular way while their status is verified or they have been removal with assistance from airlines.[16]

Before opening the CATECI in August 2006 migrants were detained in 5th police station in San José (known as the “Quinta Comisaría”).[17] According to the 2002 Codehuca report:

“The detention centre is located in the premises of the ‘Quinta Comisaría’ in San José. It has a capacity of 80 persons, according to the Chief of the Immigration Police, Allen Calderón. Occasionally, the detained persons have to sleep on the floor. The centre does not have adequate hygienic conditions; the showers do not have doors and there are only two lavatories. The recreation area is very small, there is no place to eat and there is no direct light. The interior of the centre smells awfully. Families or friends of the detained persons should provide the necessary personal hygienic products. There is no public phone in the centre and the immigrants are not allowed to use the phone in the office to call their families or friends. Staff of the Ministry of Health has visited the detention centre few times, because it was informed of the bad hygienic conditions of the centre. The Ministry of Health was supposed to write a report of recommendations, however, the guards are still waiting for this report, which has not arrived yet. The Ombudsman Human Rights Office noted that occasionally underaged immigrants are detained in the ‘Quinta Comisaría,’ which is a severe violation of the Convention of Child Rights and Costa Rican law.”[18]

 

[1] UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDESA). 2013. International Migration 2013 Wall Chart. http://www.un.org/en/development/desa/population/publications/migration/migration-wallchart-2013.shtml.

[2] International Organization for Migration (IOM). Website. “Costa Rica: Migration Trends.” http://costarica.iom.int/en/costa_rica/migration_trends_in_the_mission/ (16 June 2015).

[3] Central American Human Rights Commission (CODEHUCA). 2002. “SITUATION OF NICARAGUAN IMMIGRANTS IN COSTA RICA – CERD 2002.” Available at https://www.fidh.org/IMG/pdf/costarica2002cerd.pdf.

[4] Central American Human Rights Commission (CODEHUCA). 2002. “SITUATION OF NICARAGUAN IMMIGRANTS IN COSTA RICA – CERD 2002.” Available at https://www.fidh.org/IMG/pdf/costarica2002cerd.pdf.

[5] International Detention Coalition (IDC). 2014. INFORME REGIONAL DETENCIÓN MIGRATORIA Y ALTERNATIVAS A LA DETENCIÓN EN LAS AMÉRICAS. October 2014.

[6] Richard, Gabriela (Centro Internacional de Derechos Humanos de Personas Migrantes CIDEHUM). 2014. Global Detention Project Questionnaire: Costa Rica. 29 September 2014.

[7] Richard, Gabriela (Centro Internacional de Derechos Humanos de Personas Migrantes CIDEHUM). 2014. Global Detention Project Questionnaire: Costa Rica. 29 September 2014.

[8] Richard, Gabriela (Centro Internacional de Derechos Humanos de Personas Migrantes CIDEHUM). 2014. Global Detention Project Questionnaire: Costa Rica. 29 September 2014.

[9] UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). UNHCR Statistical Yearbook 2013. 2014. www.unhcr.org/54cf9bd69.html. UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). UNHCR Statistical Yearbook 2012. 2013. http://www.unhcr.org/52a7213b9.html.

[10] Richard, Gabriela (Centro Internacional de Derechos Humanos de Personas Migrantes CIDEHUM). 2014. Global Detention Project Questionnaire: Costa Rica. 29 September 2014.

[11] Guerrero Segura, Efraín (UHCR Costa Rica). 2015. Email correspondence with Izabella Majcher (Global Detention Project). June 2015.

[12] Dirección General de Migración y Extranjería. 2014. Proyecto: Creación del Nuevo CATECI. Guerrero Segura, Efraín (UHCR Costa Rica). 2015. Email correspondence with Izabella Majcher (Global Detention Project). June 2015.

[13] Richard, Gabriela (Centro Internacional de Derechos Humanos de Personas Migrantes CIDEHUM). 2014. Global Detention Project Questionnaire: Costa Rica. 29 September 2014.

[14] Mecanismo Nacional de Prevención de la Tortura and Defensoría de los Habitantes de la República. 2014. Informe Anual de Labores 2013. http://www.ohchr.org/Documents/HRBodies/OPCAT/NPM/CostaRica2013.pdf.

[15] Dirección General de Migración y Extranjería. 2014. Proyecto: Creación del Nuevo CATECI.

[16] Richard, Gabriela (Centro Internacional de Derechos Humanos de Personas Migrantes CIDEHUM). 2015. Email correspondence with Izabella Majcher (Global Detention Project). June 2015.

[17] ACNUR/Dirección General de Migración y Extranjería. 2007. DONACION DE ACNUR MEJORARÁ CONDICIONES DE EXTRANJEROS DETENIDOS EN CENTRO DE APREHENCION EN HATILLO. Comunicado de Prensa Conjunto. 29 May 2007.

[18] Central American Human Rights Commission (CODEHUCA). 2002. “SITUATION OF NICARAGUAN IMMIGRANTS IN COSTA RICA – CERD 2002.” Available at https://www.fidh.org/IMG/pdf/costarica2002cerd.pdf.

IMMIGRATION AND DETENTION-RELATED STATISTICS

Total number of detained minors
Not Available
2017
Number of dedicated long-term immigration detention centres
1
2014
Estimated capacity of dedicated long-term immigration detention centres
50
2014
Number of dedicated medium-term immigration detention centres
0
2014
Number of immigration offices
0
2014
Number of transit facilities
1
2015
Number of criminal facilities
0
2014
Number of ad hoc facilities
0
2014
Criminal prison population
17,440
2014
14,963
2012
12,110
2010
9,211
2007
8,890
2004
7,649
2001
6,004
1998
3,490
1995
3,443
1992
Percentage of foreign prisoners
14.6
2013
14.2
2006
Prison population rate (per 100,000 of national population)
352
2014
314
2012
259
2010
207
2007
209
2004
191
2001
160
1998
100
1995
107
1992
Population
5,100,000
2020
4,808,000
2015
4,800,000
2012
International migrants
421,700
2015
419,600
2013
International migrants as a percentage of the population
8.8
2015
8.6
2013
Refugees
4,547
2018
4,493
2017
4,152
2016
3,616
2015
20,744
2014
Ratio of refugees per 1000 inhabitants
0.86
2016
4.36
2014
4.38
2012
Total number of new asylum applications
5,834
2016
1,373
2014
1,170
2012
Refugee recognition rate
15.1
2014
Stateless persons
82
2018
71
2017
127
2016
2,613
2015
0
2014
Total number of immigration detainees by year
Number of immigration detainees on a given day
Top nationalities of detainees
Number of persons granted alternatives to immigration detention
Number of detained asylum seekers
Number of detained unaccompanied minors
Number of detained accompanied minors
Number of detained stateless persons
Number of apprehensions of non-citizens
Immigration detainees as a percentage of total international migrant population
Estimated total immigration detention capacity
Number of persons removed/returned (voluntary returns and deportations)
Number of deportations/forced returns only
Percentage of persons removed in relation to total number of people placed in removal procedures
Estimated number of undocumented migrants

SOCIO-ECONOMIC INDICATORS

Gross Domestic Product per capita (in USD)
10,415
2014
10,185
2013
Remittances to the country
611
2015
585
2011
Remittances from the country
271
2010
Unemployment Rate
2014
Net official development assistance (ODA) (in millions USD)
53.5
2014
Human Development Index Ranking (UNDP)
69 (High)
2015
68 (High)
2014
Unemployment rate amongst migrants
Detention for deterrence
Pew Global Attitudes Poll on Immigration
Immigration Index Score
World Bank Rule of Law Index
Domestic Opinion Polls on Immigration

DOMESTIC LAWS AND POLICIES

Legal tradition
Civil law
Constitutional guarantees?
Yes (Political Constitution of the Republic of Costa Rica, article 37) 1949 1949
1949
Core pieces of national legislation
Ley General de Migración y Extranjería N° 8764 (2009)
2009
Regulations, standards, guidelines
Reglamento de Control Migratorio (Decreto Ejecutivo N° 36769) (2011)
2011
Manual Administrativo y de procedimientos de los centros de Aprehensión temporal para extranjeros en condiciones irregulares (2008)
2008
Immigration-status-related grounds
Detention for unauthorised entry or stay
2015
Detention to effect removal
2015
Maximum length for administrative immigration detention in law.
No Limit
2014
Maximum length of time in custody prior to issuance of a detention order
1
2014
Provision of basic procedural standards
Right to appeal the lawfulness of detention (Yes)
2015
Information to detainees (Yes)
2015
Access to consular assistance (Yes) Yes
2015
Right to legal counsel (Yes)
2015
Access to free interpretation services (Yes) Yes
2015
Access to asylum procedures (Yes)
2015
Compensation for unlawful detention () No
2014
Independent review of detention (No) No
2014
Types of non-custodial measures
Supervised release and/or reporting (Yes) infrequently
2015
Registration (deposit of documents) (Yes) infrequently
2015
Release on bail (Yes) No
2014
Home detention (curfew) (Yes) No
2014
Is the detention of vulnerable persons provided in law? Are they detained in practice?
Accompanied minors (Prohibited)
2015
Unaccompanied minors (Prohibited) No
2015
Asylum seekers () No
2014
Stateless persons (Not mentioned)
2014
Pregnant women (Not mentioned)
2014
Elderly (Not mentioned)
2014
Persons with disabilities (Not mentioned)
2014
Victims of trafficking (Not mentioned)
2014
Refugees () No
2014
Additional legislation
Non-immigration-status-related grounds providing for administrative detention in immigration legislation.
Does the country provide specific criminal penalties for immigration-related violations?
Grounds for criminal immigration-related detention/incarceration and maximum potential duration of incarceration
Has the country decriminalized immigration-related violations?
Longest recorded instance of immigration detention.
Average length of detention
Maximum length of detention for asylum-seekers
Maximum length of detention for persons detained upon arrival at ports of entry
Impact of alternatives
Mandatory detention
Expedited/fast track removal
Re-entry ban

INTERNATIONAL LAW

Individual complaints procedure
Acceptance Year
CRPD, Optional Protocol to o the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities 2015
2015
ICESCR, Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, 2008 2014
2014
CRC, [Third] Optional Protocol to the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child establishing a communications procedure, 2011 2014
2014
CAT, declaration under article 22 of the Convention 2002
2002
CEDAW, Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women, 1999 2001
2001
ICERD, declaration under article 14 of the Convention 1974
1974
ICCPR, First Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, 1966 1968
1968
Ratio of complaints procedures accepted
Observation Date
7/8
7/8
Relevant recommendations issued by treaty bodies
Recommendation Year
Human Rights Committee 30. The State party should step up efforts to improve living conditions at migrant detention centres, including with regard to appropriate sanitation and health services, with a view to fully complying with the provisions of article 10. The State should guarantee that migrants are held in administrative detention only when justified as a reasonable, necessary and proportionate measure, guaranteeing as well that such detention is used only as a measure of last resort and for the shortest time possible. 2016
2016
Committee against Torture §10 The State party should ensure that legislation provides for alternatives to custody for migrants. The State party should also set a maximum legal period for detention pending deportation, which should in no circumstances be indefinite. The Committee invites the State party to continue its efforts to improve detention conditions for all immigrants, in cases where administrative detention is absolutely necessary, in accordance with the Body of Principles for the Protection of All Persons under Any Form of Detention or Imprisonment and the Minimum Rules for the Treatment of Prisoners. The Committee recommends the adoption of protocols and the provision of proper training for border officials and personnel working in centres for the administrative detention of aliens for the identification of victims of trafficking and others who are entitled to international protection. 2008
2008
Human Rights Committee §9 The State party should take steps to end overcrowding in detention centres, including those administered by the migration authorities, and to ensure compliance with the requirements of article 10. In particular, the State party should take into consideration the Standard Minimum Rules for the Treatment of Prisoners. 2007
2007
Regional legal instruments
Year of Ratification (Treaty) / Transposed (Directive) / Adoption (Regulation)
ACHR, American Convention on Human Rights 1970
1970
IACPPT, Inter-American Convention to Prevent and Punish Torture 1999
1999
APACHR, Additional Protocol to the American Convention on Human Rights in the Area of Economic, Social and Cultural Rights 1999
1999
CBDP, Inter-American Convention on the Prevention, Punishment and Eradication of Violence against Women (Convention of Belem do Para) 1995
1995
IACFDP, Inter-American convention on Forced Disappearance of Persons 1996
1996
Relevant recommendations of the UN Universal Periodic Review
Observation Date
Yes 2010
2017
Yes 2014
Ratio of relevant international treaties ratified
International treaty reservations
Treaty bodies decisions on individual complaints
Regional treaty reservations
Regional judicial decisions on individual complaints
Recommendations issued by regional human rights mechanisms
Bilateral/multilateral agreements linked to readmission
Visits by special procedures of the Human Rights Council
Relevant recommendations by UN Special Procedures

INSTITUTIONAL INDICATORS

Federal or centralized governing system
Centralized system
2015
Centralized or decentralized immigration authority
Centralized immigration authority
2015
Custodial authority
Direccion General de Migracion y Extranjeria (Ministerio de Gobernacion y Policia) Interior or Home Affairs
2015
Direccion General de Migracion y Extranjeria (Ministerio de Gobernacion y Policia) Interior or Home Affairs
2014
Direccion General de Migracion y Extranjeria (Ministerio de Gobernacion) Interior or Home Affairs
2007
Apprehending authorities
Policía Profesional de Migración ()
2015
Detention Facility Management
Policía de migración (Governmental)
2015
Private company (Private For-Profit)
2015
Dirección General de Migración y Extranjería and Policía Profesional de Migracion (Governmental)
2014
Dirección General de Migración y Extranjería and Policía Profesional (Governmental)
2014
Direccion General de Migracion y Extrajeria/Policia de Migracion y Extranjeria (Governmental)
2007
Direccion General de Migracion y Extrajeria (Governmental)
2007
Formally designated detention estate?
Yes (Dedicated immigration detention facilities)
2015
Types of detention facilities used in practice
Yes () Yes
2015
()
()
()
()
()
()
()
Authorized monitoring institutions
Asociación de Consultores y Asesores Internacionales (ACAI) (Non-Governmental Organizations (NGO))
2014
UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) (International or Regional Bodies (IRBs))
2014
Defensoría de los Habitantes de Costa Rica (Ombudsman) (National Human Rights Institution (or Ombudsperson) (NHRI))
2014
Mecanismo Nacional de Prevención contra la Tortura (OPCAT National Preventive Mechanism (NPM))
2014
Do NGOs carry out visits?
Yes
2014
Do international and/or regional bodies (IRBs) visit immigration-related detention facilities?
Yes
2014
Is the national human rights institution (NHRI) recognized as independent?
Does NHRI carry out visits?
Does NHRI have capacity to receive complaints?
Does NHRI publicly release reports on immigration detention?
Does national preventive mechanism (NPM) carry out visits?
Does NPM have capacity to receive complaints?
Does NPM publicly release reports on immigration detention?
NGO capacity to receive complaints?
Do NGOs publish reports on immigration detention?
Do parliamentary organs carry out visits?
Do parliamentary organs have capacity to receive complaints?
Do parliamentary organs publicly report on their detention findings?
Do internal inspection agencies (IIAs) carry out visits?
Do IIAs have capacity to receive complaints?
Do IIAs publicly report their findings from detention inspections?
Do IRBs publicly report their findings from inspections?
Types of privatisation/outsourcing
Detention contractors and other non-state entities
Estimated annual budget for detention operations
Estimated annual budgets for particular detention-related activities
Estimated cost per detainees day (in USD)
Estimated annual budget for non-custodial measures (in USD)
Estimated costs of non-custodial measures (in USD)
Does the country receive external sources of funding?
Description of foreign assistance