No detention centre mapping data


Bulgaria Immigration Detention

Bulgaria is a transit country for immigration into Europe. Although the overall numbers of migrants entering the country have been smaller than in neighbouring Poland and Hungary, Bulgaria has been pressured by the European Union to restrict irregular entrants.

Quick Facts


Immigration detainees (2017): 2,989
Detained asylum seekers (2017): 37
Detained minors (2017): 736
Immigration detention capacity (2017): 700
Persons expelled (2017): 1,755
International migrants (2017): 154,000
New asylum applications (2017): 3,700

Profile Updated: August 2011

Bulgaria Immigration Detention Profile

Bulgaria is a transit country for immigration into Europe. Although the overall numbers of migrants entering the country have been smaller than in neighbouring Poland and Hungary, Bulgaria has been pressured by theEuropean Union (EU) to restrict irregular entrants. In March 2011, Bulgaria opened a second immigration detention facility. According to officials in Sofia, the new facility, located close to the nearly 200-km border with Turkey, is proof that the country is ready to join Europe’s visa-free Schengen zone. Said the Bulgarian interior ministry in early 2011, "The opening of a new home for illegal immigrants in Lyubimets … shows Bulgaria has fulfilled all the Schengen criteria.”

Many observers are concerned that Bulgaria will not be able to cope with the expected increases in the numbers of people who will attempt to use the country as an entry point into Europe once it joins Schengen, which is scheduled to occur in late 2011 or 2012 (Tsvetkova 2011). The response in Sofia has been to focus on improving border security and interdiction (Al Jazeera 2011). This focus has spurred criticism from rights groups, who argue that asylum seekers are facing undue restrictions. Describing the new detention centre in Lyubimets, where refugee claimants have been detained, an official from the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) said, “This place is not meant and not designed and not appropriate for asylum seekers” (UNHCR 2011).

Detention Policy

Key norms. Bulgaria’s immigration norms and regulations are contained in the Law for Foreigners in the Republic of Bulgaria (LF), the Law on Entry, Residence and Exit in the Republic of Bulgaria of EU Citizens and their Family Members (LEUCFM), the Law on Asylum and Refugees (LAR), and the Regulations for Implementation of the Law for the Ministry of Interior. Both the LF and LAR have been amended since 2007 to include new EU measures, such as the 2008 European Return Directive.

Grounds for detention. Foreign nationals in Bulgaria can be detained and expelled if they have: a) entered the country illegally; b) overstayed their permit; c) stayed using false or forged documents; or d) been deemed a threat to public order or national security (LF, Art. 41/2). Foreigners detained under these circumstances are held at the Busmantsi and Lyubimets detention centres, located outside Sofia and close to the Bulgarian border with Turkey and Greece, respectively (LF, Art. 44(6)).

The language used in these laws can be misleading. Detention is referred to in the LF as “coercive accommodation,” while migrants are ”accommodated” and not “detained” (Ilareva 2007a). The Busmantsi and Lyubimest facilities are officially referred to as “Special Homes for Temporary Placement of Foreigners” (BHC 2010; CPT 2008).

Administrative agencies. Immigration policy in Bulgaria falls under the Migration Directorate (MD) of the Ministry of Interior (MOI). Established in 2003, the directorate is responsible for the administrative control of foreign nationals. Article 44(6) of the Law for Foreigners gives the MOI the authority to issue detention orders to migrants. It is in charge of the management, maintenance, and security of facilities used to detain foreign nationals awaiting deportation (MD website).

The MOI is also home to the National Service Border Police (NSBP), a specialized agency responsible for securing and managing Bulgaria’s borders. Its main duties are the prevention, detection, and investigation of crimes related to illegal immigration (NSBP website). Under Article 86 of the MOI regulations, the Border Police can arrest migrants attempting to illegally cross the border and place them in specific detention premises.

When dealing with asylum seekers, the Migration Directorate and the Border Police work in cooperation with the State Agency for Refugees (SAR) (see Regulations for the MOI, Art. 88b). The SAR manages Bulgaria’s facilities for asylum seekers, including transit centres, registration-and-reception centres, and integration centres (LAR, Art. 47(2)).

Length of detention. After adopting the European Return Directive 2008/155 in May 2009, Bulgaria reduced its maximum limit on the detention of migrants to six months, as per Article 15 (5) of the directive. Before this change, migrants could be held in detention indefinitely. In “exceptional” circumstances detention can be extended up to 18 months, but only after the case has undergone judicial review. The court’s decision in these cases is made every six months and is not subject to appeal (see amended Law for Foreigners, Art. 44 (8); Art. 46a (3)(4)). Moreover, the review process is held behind closed doors without the detainees present. This has been criticised as a violation of the right to an oral hearing before the court (JRS 2010, p. 143).

In a December 2009 ruling, the European Court of Justice held that Bulgaria must abide by detention limits in the case of Said Kadzoev. Kadzoev, a Russian national of Chechen origin, had been detained at the Busmantsi detention centre in Sofia since October 2006 awaiting deportation. After emphasizing that foreigners can only be detained if there is a reasonable opportunity for deportation, the court ruled that Bulgarian authorities were obliged to “observe the absolute maximum 18-months period of immigration detention and to release Said Kadzoev immediately” (BHC 2009). The ruling has been hailed as a victory for migrants and a precedent in EC law by several human rights groups. However, since the directive does not cover repeated detentions, there are still concerns that once migrants are released they will simply be picked up again and be detained for another 18 months (Kostadinov 2010; BHC 2009).

In a 2010 report published by JRS-Europe, the Bulgarian Helsinki Committee (BHC) reported that the average length of detention at the Busmantsi detention centre before implementation of the Return Directive was just over 14 months. This was significant as it represented the highest detention duration among the 23 member states covered in the report (JRS 2010). When the Global Detention Project contacted the BHC in mid-2010, nearly a year after the directive was implemented, the group reported that the average length had decreased to less than 10 months, still higher than the standard maximum (six months) provided for in the directive (Savova 2010c). As of mid-2011, according to BHC, the six-month maximum was generally being applied (Savova 2011).

Access to appeal. Specific deadlines for the appeal process were included in amendments to the Law for Foreigners in 2009. Under Article 46a, migrants can appeal their detention, but they must do so within three days of being placed in the detention centre. The administrative court must make a decision on the appeal within one month. The act of appealing does not suspend the detention order (LF, Art. 46a).

Human rights groups have criticised the three-day deadline as being unreasonably short, particularly since translation services are not always ensured for detainees. In a 2010 report, JRS-Europe argued that it undermines detainees’ ability to develop a proper legal defence against their detention order (JRS 2010, p. 143). In a December 2010 report, BHC advocated for an amendment to the Law for Foreigners to address this discriminatory provision (Savova 2011). In January 2011 the law was amended to the current deadline of seven days and the appeal is heard by the court in open sessions (amended Law on Foreigners, Art. 46a(1) and (2)).

Asylum seekers. Bulgarian law does not provide an explicit rule for detaining asylum seekers. Under the Law on Asylum and Refugees, migrants seeking asylum must submit their application in person to either the SAR or another government authority, who must then pass it along to the SAR. Within 15 days, asylum applicants must be informed about how the asylum procedure works, what their rights and obligations are, and the names of organisations that provide legal and social assistance to foreigners (LAR, Art. 58). While awaiting a decision, which can take several months, asylum seekers are accommodated in one of Bulgaria’s two non-secure Reception and Accommodation Centres (RACs) (LAR, Art. 29(4); Savova 2010a).

Migrants who submit an asylum application after being detained for illegally entering or staying in Bulgaria are held in one of the country’s two detention centres. In theory, this detention is meant to be temporary until transfer to one of the RACs is possible (JRS 2010). According to a source at the Bulgarian Helsinki Committee (BHC), until the beginning of 2010, asylum seekers could spend up to four months in detention before being released to one of the RACs. Under more recent practice, asylum seekers in this situation spend approximately seven to 30 days at the detention centre before being transferred to an RAC (Savova 2011).

Asylum seekers in detention are at risk of being deported before they are transferred to an RAC, although instances of this are rare. This is due to the delay between when an application is submitted and when it is officially registered (Savova 2010a; Ilareva 2007b). In its 2009 annual report, the BHC highlighted the case of Turkish national Veisel Aktash, who was deported by the Migration Directorate “in contradiction with Bulgaria’s international obligations in the field of asylum and refugees and the EU’s acquis communautaire” (BHC 2010).

Asylum seekers whose applications have been rejected are supposed to remain within an RAC if they are appealing the decision. It is only if the appeal has also been denied that they are moved to a detention centre to await deportation. However, according to the Inter Press Service, rejected asylum seekers held at a detention centre can remain in detention “for years while authorities sort out their documentation and return trips” (Ciobanu 2009).

Detention Infrastructure

Bulgaria has two dedicated migrant detention centres: the Busmantsi Detention Centre—sometimes referred to in official documents as the “Special Home for Temporary Placement of Foreigners”—which is located near Sofia (BHC 2010; CPT 2008); and the Lyubimets Detention Centre—or the “Specialized Center for Temporary Accommodation of Foreign Nationals”—situated near the border with Turkey and Greece (UNHCR 2011; Tsvetkova 2011).

The Busmantsi center was established in March 2006 “as a civilised solution to the challenges Bulgaria faces as an EU ‘frontier’ country” (Kostadinov 2010). The facility has an estimated capacity of 400 (Savova 2010c). Some 100 were being detained at the centre as of July 2010 (Ciobanu 2010). According to a source at the Bulgarian Helsinki Committee (BHC), the average length of detention at the Busmantsi facility is 4-10 months (Savova 2010c).

The Lyubimets detention facility opened in early 2011. Described by the country’s interior ministry as a fulfilment of Bulgaria’s Schengen requirements (Koleva 2011), Lyubimets was reportedly built with funding under the Schengen accord and has a capacity of 300 (EuroPost 2011).

Bulgaria is scheduled to open a “transit centre” for asylum seekers in Pastrogor, also near the Turkish border, in 2011 (Tsvetkova 2011). Billed as a necessary addition to the country’s asylum infrastructure, the Pastrogor Transit Centre, which has a capacity of 300, has been criticized by some observers who claim it will operate as a “closed” (or secure) facility that denies asylum seekers freedom of movement (Ilareva 2011). Other observers, however, have offered a different characterization, saying that the transit facility is intended to be non-secure (Savova 2011). As of this writing in August 2011, the facility had not yet opened.

Built with funding from the EU Phare Programme (Tsvetkova 2011), the transit centre is reportedly “designed to house people undergoing the Dublin procedure on determining the responsible Member State and for fast-track processing of manifestly unfounded applications of ‘illegally staying foreigners’ (Article 47, Paragraph 2.1. of the Law on Asylum and Refugees).

According to an official with the State Refugee Agency, which will manage the Pastrogor facility: “The Transit Center in Pastrogor is a very important unit of the agency. Currently the agency has two units, a reception and registration center in Sofia and another such center near the southern town of Nova Zagora. The two centers’ capacity however is insufficient and the new Transit Center is expected to fill in the gap. It is close to the Specialized Center for Temporary Accommodation of Foreign Nationals in the village of Lyubimets, at the Migration Directorate of the Interior Ministry. The centers being close to each other will help facilitate coordination between institutions. For example, if an economic immigrant is refused protection he will be moved to the center in Lyubimets where from he will either be taken out of the country, sent to a third country or to his country of origin” [sic] (quoted in Tsvetkova 2011).

There are two non-secure Reception and Accommodation Centres (RACs) for asylum seekers in Bulgaria: one within the premises of the State Agency for Refugees in Sofia; and one in the village of Banya near Nova Zagora, approximately 300 kilometres from Sofia. Both were established in 1999 and are managed by the SAR (IOM 2008, pp. 49-50; UNHCR 1999). The capacity at the centres is usually at 100 percent (300 at Sofia and up to 100 at Banya) (Savova 2010c).

The Global Detention Project classifies the RACs as non-secure facilities because individuals are not prevented from leaving the facility after going through an initial medical examination (LAR, Art. 29(4)). In exceptional cases, migrants are quarantined while undergoing the exam (Savova 2010a). Once the tests are completed, asylum seekers are free to leave the centre during the day or night. They need only ask permission if they wish to leave the centre to find new accommodation (Savova 2010c).

Lastly, the National Service Border Police (NSBP) operates a small facility at the Turkish-Bulgarian border checkpoint of Kapitan Andreevo. It is used to hold migrants detained by the border police for up to 24 hours, after which they must either be released or transferred to the detention centre in Busmantsi (Savova 2010a). Because confinement at the police facility is under 72 hours, the Global Detention Project does not classify it as part of Bulgaria’s overall immigration detention infrastructure.

Conditions. The Busmantsi and Lyubimets detention centres are reportedly prison-like in appearance and operation. They have high walls topped with barbed wire, and security guards make use of cameras and restricted areas (Ilareva 2008; Savova 2011).

Conditions at the Busmantsi centre have consistently been criticized by human rights groups, particularly in light of recent highly publicised cases of mistreatment. Observers have also expressed concern about the lack of information provided detainees (JRS 2010).

The most common complaint from detainees has been inadequate health care. According to the Bulgarian Helsinki Committee (BHC), “alongside protracted periods of detention, malnutrition and lack of psychological support, one of the most recurrent problems reported by detainees is extremely poor levels of medical care, lack of medicines and treatment.” As the BHC highlights, rather than employing a permanent medical staff, the Busmantsi centre brings in doctors and nurses on a monthly rotational basis. This makes monitoring and treating detainees difficult (Ciobanu 2009).

According to a 2010 survey conducted by JRS-Europe at the Busmantsi detention centre, almost 90 percent of detainees reported feeling unsafe because of a deterioration in their health. Food was largely reported as unpleasant, lacking variety, and in very small portions. Detainees also indicated that poor nutrition was a constant stress and nearly three-fourths of those surveyed reported that they did not sleep well (JRS 2010).

The absence of proper medical care has been blamed as a cause for the death in October 2009 of Hasun Albaadzh, a Syrian national who had been held at the Busmantsi detention centre for 34 months. According to reports by the Justice 21 Civil Initiative, Albaadzh’s repeated requests for medical attention were ignored, and he was not taken to a hospital despite the fact that his medical conditions were known by the centre’s administration (ACET 2009).

In another case, Jonson Ibitui, a Nigerian national, died of a heart attack shortly after being released from the Busmantsi facility. One human rights group has argued that “the massive heart attack came as a result of the psychological stress and is a direct consequence of the…one year meaningless detention in the centre” (ACET 2009).

There have also been numerous reports of guards mistreating detainees (U.S. State 2010). The 2010 JRS-Europe survey indicated that 44.4 percent of respondents reported feeling “very unsafe,” mainly because of the security guards (JRS 2010).

Demanding more humane treatment, better living conditions, and health services, detainees at the Busmantsi centre have staged several hunger strikes and protests in recent years. A hunger strike in February 2010 came to an end only after facility management promised to improve conditions (Kostadinov 2010).

Criticism has also been levelled against the conditions at Bulgaria’s two Reception and Accommodation Centres in Sofia and Banya. A 2008 report from the European Refugee Fund highlighted that the centres had poor living conditions and lacked accessibility for disabled people (ERF 2008). The 2010 JRS-Europe report also highlighted that in practice, the lack of capacity in the RACs “resulted regularly in detention” of asylum seekers “with physical or mental disabilities, pregnant women and families with children” (JRS 2010).

From 15-19 December 2008, the European Committee for the Prevention of Torture (CPT) visited the Busmantsi detention centre (CPT Press Release 2008). As of July 2010, CPT had yet to publish the report of the visit. The CPT was scheduled to revisit the country in 2010 (CPT Press Release 2009).

Facts & Figures

Bulgaria operates two dedicated immigration detention centres, with a combined capacity of 700.

Due to its geographic location, Bulgaria is often used as a transit country by migrants. In 2010, a total of 1,705 third-country nationals were apprehended in Bulgaria for irregular presence, all of which were ordered to leave the country. 295 of these were returned by Bulgarian authorities, and 210 of those returned were sent to a third country (European Commission 2011, p. 76). Some 3,070 individuals were refused entry to Bulgaria in 2010;  two at a land border; 60 at a sea border; and 455 at an air border (European Commission 2011, p.78). This figure represents more than half of the number of migrants refused entry into the country in 2005 (IOM 2008). There were a total of 19 unaccompanied minors registered in Bulgaria in 2010 (European Commission 2011, p.81).

The routes used by asylum seekers run most often through Turkey and more rarely through Romania and Greece (ERF 2008). In 2010 a total of 1,025 asylum applicants were registered in Bulgaria; 515 decisions were made, of which 140 were positive and 375 were negative. Of the positive decisions, 20 people were granted refugee status and 120 were granted subsidiary protection (European Commission 2011, p.79).

According to a report from Radio Bulgaria: “Some 1,000 individuals annually seek asylum in Bulgaria. A peak of asylum seekers was seen in 2001-2003 when the armed conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq raged with the greatest intensity. In 2002 alone 5,000 looked for asylum in this country. After that their numbers began to decline reaching a low of just 600 in 2006” (Tsvetkova 2011).

In 2009, 850 applications were submitted to the State Agency for Refugees compared to 750 in 2008 and 980 in 2007 (UNHCR 2010). This is a significant decrease from earlier in the decade, when asylum applications peaked at nearly 3,000 in 2002 (SAR 2010b). Very few of these asylum claims, however, are accepted. In 2009, only 39 asylum seekers were granted refugee status while 380 were refused. In 2010, of the 1025 asylum applications received, the SAR accepted only 20 while refusing 386. One hundred-eighteen were granted humanitarian status (SAR 2010a; Savova 2011). Altogether, 580 asylum seekers were detained in 2010, 380 (or 65 percent) were released in less than a month; 183 were border applicants; and another 397 applied from the Busmantsi detention center (BHC 2010; Savova 2011).The majority of asylum seekers in 2010 came from Iraq, with 452 claims made in that year (SAR 2010). Other top places of origin in 2009 were the Palestinian territories, Afghanistan, Iran, and Armenia (UNHCR 2010).

Since implementing the European Return Directive in May 2009, the average length of detention has dropped to six months (Savova 2011). 

In 2006, the Bulgarian Helsinki Commission reported that estimates of the country’s undocumented population were between 30,000 and 50,000 (BHC 2006). The BHC estimated that it had dropped to 10,000 by 2010 (Savova 2011).

References

Centres List

No detention centres data available

Statistics Expand all



2,989

Total number of immigration detainees by year

2017

  • Total number of immigration detainees by year
NumberObservation Date
2,9892017
3,3322017
18,3912016
11,3142016
27,7242015
11,9022015
5,9922014
2,7002013
6,3032013
5,4642013
2,0162012
2,0472012
1,0742011
1,0482011
9732010
8322009


Afghanistan

Top nationalities of detainees

2017

  • Top nationalities of detainees
Countries ordered by rankObservation Date
Afghanistan, Syria, Iraq2017


14

Number of persons granted alternatives to immigration detention

2017

  • Number of persons granted alternatives to immigration detention
NumberObservation Date
142017


37

Number of detained asylum seekers

2017

  • Number of detained asylum seekers
NumberObservation Date
372017
11,3142016


736

Total number of detained minors

2017

  • Total number of detained minors
NumberObservation Date
7362017
6672013
2472012


Not Available

Number of detained unaccompanied minors

2017

  • Number of detained unaccompanied minors
NumberObservation Date
Not Available2017


736

Number of detained accompanied minors

2017

  • Number of detained accompanied minors
NumberObservation Date
7362017


3

Number of detained stateless persons

2017

  • Number of detained stateless persons
NumberObservation Date
32017


2,595

Number of apprehensions of non-citizens

2017

  • Number of apprehensions of non-citizens
NumberObservation Date
2,5952017
12,8702014
5,2602013
2,0502012


8.71

Immigration detainees as a percentage of total international migrant population

2017

  • Immigration detainees as a percentage of total international migrant population
PercentageObservation Date
8.712017
9.332015
6.52013
1.282010


700

Estimated total immigration detention capacity

2017

  • Estimated total immigration detention capacity
NumberObservation Date
7002017


2

Number of dedicated long-term immigration detention centres

2017

  • Number of dedicated long-term immigration detention centres
NumberObservation Date
22017
32015


700

Estimated capacity of dedicated long-term immigration detention centres

2017

  • Estimated capacity of dedicated long-term immigration detention centres
NumberObservation Date
7002017
1,0402016
9402015


2

Number of dedicated medium-term immigration detention centres

2017

  • Number of dedicated medium-term immigration detention centres
NumberObservation Date
22017


1,755

Number of persons removed/returned (voluntary returns and deportations)

2017

  • Number of persons removed/returned (voluntary returns and deportations)
NumberObservation Date
1,7552017
7352015
1,1552014
1,1002013
8352012


485

Number of deportations/forced returns only

2017

  • Number of deportations/forced returns only
NumberObservation Date
4852017


9

Percentage of persons removed in relation to total number of people placed in removal procedures

2014

  • Percentage of persons removed in relation to total number of people placed in removal procedures
PercentageObservation Date
92014


7,345

Criminal prison population

2016

  • Criminal prison population
NumberObservation Date
7,3452016
9,0282014
10,0062013


2.93

Percentage of foreign prisoners

2016

  • Percentage of foreign prisoners
PercentageObservation Date
2.932016
22012
22012


103

Prison population rate (per 100,000 of national population)

2016

  • Prison population rate (per 100,000 of national population)
NumberObservation Date
1032016
1252014
1382013



7,100,000

Population

2017

  • Population
NumberObservation Date
7,100,0002017
7,150,0002015
7,400,0002012


154,000

International migrants

2017

  • International migrants
NumberObservation Date
154,0002017
102,1002015
84,1002013
76,0002010


2.2

International migrants as a percentage of the population

2017

  • International migrants as a percentage of the population
PercentageObservation Date
2.22017
1.42015
1.22013


2,595

Estimated number of undocumented migrants

2017

  • Estimated number of undocumented migrants
NumberObservation Date
2,5952017


804

Refugees

2017

  • Refugees
NumberObservation Date
8042017
17,7742016
16,5572015
4,3202014


1.53

Ratio of refugees per 1000 inhabitants

2014

  • Ratio of refugees per 1000 inhabitants
NumberObservation Date
1.532014
0.312012


3,700

Total number of new asylum applications

2017

  • Total number of new asylum applications
NumberObservation Date
3,7002017
19,2652016
11,0812014
1,3872012


68.8

Refugee recognition rate

2014

  • Refugee recognition rate
NumberObservation Date
68.82014


73

Stateless persons

2017

  • Stateless persons
NumberObservation Date
732017
672016
672015
02014

Domestic Law Expand all

Legal tradition Show sources
NameObservation Date
Civil law

Constitutional guarantees? Show sources
NameConstitution and ArticlesYear AdoptedLast Year Amended
YesConstitution of the Republic of Bulgaria, Article 30.19912015
YesConstitution of the Republic of Bulgaria, Article 30.19911991
Core pieces of national legislation Show sources
NameYear AdoptedLast Year Amended
Foreigners in the Republic of Bulgaria (LFRB) Act. No. 153/23.12.1998. Last Amendment, SG No. 53/27.06.201419982014
Law on Foreign Nationals in the Republic of Bulgaria, Last Amendment SG. No. 56 of 6 July 201819982018
Law on Asylum and Refugees (Закон за убежището и бежанците)20022016
Additional legislation Show sources
NameYear AdoptedLast Year Amended
Law on Legal Aid20062017
Administrative Procedure Code (APC)20062014
Criminal Code 19682010
Law on Legal Aid20052018
Regulations, standards, guidelines Show sources
NameYear Published
Regulation for the Application of the Law on the Foreigners in the Republic of Bulgaria [2011] State Gazette 51 of 05.07.2011, last amended State Gazette 57 of 28.07.2015 2011
Regulation on the Application of the Law on Foreign Nationals in the Republic of Bulgaria2011
Ordinance No. Із-1201 of 1 June 2010 on the Procedure for the Temporary Accommodation of Foreigners in the Special Homes for the Temporary Accommodation of Foreigners and Their Units and for the Organization of Their Activity2010
Ordinance on the Responsibility and Coordination of the State Bodies Implementing the Dublin Regulation and the Eurodac Regulation2008

Immigration-status-related grounds Show sources
NameObservation Date
Detention during the asylum process2018
Detention to establish/verify identity and nationality2017
Detention to effect removal2017
Detention for failing to respect non-custodial measures2017
Detention to establish/verify identity and nationality2017
Detention to effect removal2017
Detention to prevent absconding2017
Non-immigration-status-related grounds providing for administrative detention in immigration legislation. Show sources
NameObservation Date
Detention on public order, threats or security grounds2001

Does the country provide specific criminal penalties for immigration-related violations? Show sources
FinesIncarcerationObservation Date
YesYes2014
YesYes1968
Grounds for criminal immigration-related detention/incarceration and maximum potential duration of incarceration Show sources
Grounds for IncarcerationMaximum Number of Days of IncarcerationObservation Date
Unauthorized exit18252015
Unauthorized entry18252014
Unauthorized entry18251968
Unauthorized exit18251968
Has the country decriminalized immigration-related violations? Show sources
Has the country decriminalized immigration-related violations?Observation Date
Yes1968

Maximum length for administrative immigration detention in law. Show sources
Number of DaysObservation Date
5402018
5402009
Maximum length of time in custody prior to issuance of a detention order Show sources
Number of DaysObservation Date
12014
Average length of detention Show sources
Number of DaysObservation Date
252017
212013
Maximum length of detention for asylum-seekers Show sources
Number of DaysObservation Date
No Limit2016
No Limit2015

Provision of basic procedural standards Show sources
NameIn LawIn PracticeObservation Date
Right to legal counselYesYes2017
Information to detaineesYesNo2017
Access to free interpretation servicesYesinfrequently2017
Access to consular assistanceYesYes2017
Access to asylum proceduresYesinfrequently2017
Independent review of detentionYesinfrequently2017
Right to appeal the lawfulness of detentionYesinfrequently2017
Complaints mechanism regarding detention conditionsYesNo2017
Compensation for unlawful detentionYesNo2017
Right to appeal the lawfulness of detentionYes2017
Right to legal counselYes2017
Access to free interpretation servicesYes2014

Types of non-custodial measures Show sources
NameIn LawIn PracticeObservation Date
Registration (deposit of documents)Yesinfrequently2018
Release on bailYesNo2018
Provision of a guarantorYesYes2018
Unconditional releaseYesYes2017
Registration (deposit of documents)2017
Designated regional residenceYesYes2017
Designated non-secure housingNoNo2017
Release on bailNoNo2017
Electronic monitoringNoNo2017
Supervised release and/or reportingYesinfrequently2017
Supervised release and/or reportingYesinfrequently2014
Supervised release and/or reportingYesYes2001

Is the detention of vulnerable persons provided in law? Are they detained in practice? Show sources
NameIn LawIn PracticeObservation Date
WomenNot mentionedYes2017
Accompanied minorsProvidedYes2017
Unaccompanied minorsProhibitedYes2017
Stateless personsNot mentionedYes2016
Asylum seekersProvidedYes2016
ElderlyProvidedYes2016
Pregnant womenProvidedYes2016
Persons with disabilitiesProvidedYes2016
RefugeesNot mentionedYes2016
Survivors of tortureProvidedYes2016
Victims of traffickingProvidedYes2016
Unaccompanied minorsProhibitedYes2016
Accompanied minorsProvidedYes2016
Asylum seekersProvidedYes2016
Unaccompanied minorsProhibitedYes2014

Mandatory detention Show sources
FilterNameObservation Date
No2017

Expedited/fast track removal Show sources
NameObservation Date
No2017
Re-entry ban Show sources
NameObservation Date
Yes2013

International Law Expand all

International treaties Show sources
Ratio of relevant international treaties ratified
  14/19
Individual complaints procedure Show sources
NameAcceptance Year
CEDAW, Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women, 19992006
CAT, declaration under article 22 of the Convention1993
ICCPR, First Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, 19661992
Ratio of complaints procedures accepted Show sources
NumberObservation Date
3/7
3/7
Relevant recommendations issued by treaty bodies Show sources
NameRecommendation ExcerptRecommendation Year
Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination22. The Committee recommends that the State party take a human-rights based approach and integrate a non-discrimination perspective into its migration governance. Recalling its general recommendations No. 22 (1996) on refugees and displaced persons in the context of article 5 of the Convention and No. 30 (2004) on discrimination against non-citizens, the Committee urges the State party to: (a) Refrain from engaging in pushbacks and refoulement, conduct individual assessments, ensure the availability of adequate procedural safeguards, investigate effectively any excessive use of force by law enforcement officials in the context of migration at the border or in detention facilities and bring perpetrators to justice by sanctioning them adequately; (b) Decriminalize irregular border crossing and develop policies and avenues for regularizing the status of migrants, in particular those in a situation of vulnerability; (c) Increase allocations to the State Agency for Refugees to enable it to discharge its functions effectively and reinstate an adequate monthly payment for all asylum seekers residing in reception centres; (d) Put in place procedures to permit the rapid and appropriate identification of persons in vulnerable situations, ensure that staff are trained to conduct identification and referral procedures in a sensitive manner, guarantee the availability of individual and qualified legal guardians to all unaccompanied children and, to that end, strengthen the human and financial capacity of municipalities; (e) Stop the practice of placing undocumented asylum seekers in mandatory detention, consider developing alternatives to detention while ensuring that detainees enjoy due process and fair trial guarantees, continue improving the capacity and material conditions of reception centres, and ensure that all asylum seekers have access to basic services, including health care, psychological assistance and education; (f) Step up integration efforts for beneficiaries of international protection, including by facilitating access to social housing and language training, with a view to ensuring their ability to enjoy their socioeconomic rights and, to that end, effectively implement the National Strategy on Migration, Asylum and Integration.2017
Committee on the Rights of the Child51. In the light of general comment No. 6 (2005) on treatment of unaccompanied and separated children outside their country of origin, the Committee recommends that the State party: (a) Ensure that sufficient provisions are made to prevent unaccompanied asylum-seeking children from being placed in rooms with unrelated adults; [...] (c)Avoid any form of detention of asylum seekers under the age of 18 years and families with children, and consider all possible alternatives, including unconditional release, prior to detention. To that end, the Committee draws the State party’s attention to UNHCR’s Revised Guidelines on Applicable Criteria and Standards relating to the Detention of Asylum-Seekers of 26 February 1999;2016
Committee against Torture“The State party should: (a) Ensure that persons in need of international protection are not subjected to arbitrary detention, provide for judicial review of detention, envisage alternatives to detention and prohibit the detention of children; (b) Avoid registering unaccompanied children apprehended upon irregular entry as being “accompanied” by adults they are not related to and establish a single body for coordinating the child protection policy;” “(i) Reduce the level of overcrowding in migrant detention facilities, in particular in Busmantsi and Lyubimets”.2017
Committee against Torture§ 14 [...] (a) Amend article 16 of the Ordinance for the Responsibilities and Coordination between the State Agency for Refugees, the Directorate of Migration and the Border Police – in order to formally remove the rule that allows for the detention of asylum-seekers on the basis of illegal entry and ensure that asylum-seekers enjoy accommodation, documentation, access to health care, social assistance, education and language training, as provided in articles 29 and 30 (a) of the Law on Asylum and Refugees;
(b) Ensure that the detention of asylum-seekers is only used as a last resort, when necessary, for as short a period as possible and that safeguards against refoulement are fully implemented;

2011

Regional judicial decisions on individual complaints Show sources
NameDecision DetailsObservation Date
European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR)S.F. and Others v. Bulgaria, Application No. 8138/16, violation of Article 3 of the ECHR with respect of the children Y.F, S.F2 and A.F.2017
Court of Justice of European Union (CJEU)C-146/14 PPU - Mahdi, Directive 2008/115/EC — Return of illegally staying third-country nationals — Article 15 — Detention — Extension of detention — Obligations of the administrative or judicial authority — Review by a judicial authority — Third-country national without identity documents — Obstacles to implementation of a removal decision — Refusal of the embassy of the third country concerned to issue an identity document enabling the third-country national to be returned — Risk of absconding — Reasonable prospect of removal — Lack of cooperation — Whether the Member State concerned is under an obligation to issue a temporary document relating to the status of the person concerned2014
European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR)Amie and Others v. Bulgaria, Application No. 58149/08, Violation of Articles 5 § 1, 5 § 4 and 82013
European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR)

Djalti v. Bulgaria (application no. 31206/05)*

2013
European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR)Auad v. Bulgaria, Application No. 46390/10, violation of Article 5.1 and Article 13 of the Convention2012
European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR)M. and Others v. Bulgaria, Application No. 41416/08, Violations of Article 5(1) and (4), Article 8, and Article 132011
European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR)Raza v. Bulgaria, Application no. 31465/08, 11 February 2010, Violation of Articles 5 § 1, 5 § 4, 8 and 13.2010
Court of Justice of European Union (CJEU)

Kadzoev C‑357/09 PPU

2009
European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR)Al- Nashif v Bulgaria, Applciation no. 50963/99, violation of Article 5(4), Article 8 and Article 13 of the Convention2002
Recommendations issued by regional human rights mechanisms Show sources
NameRecommendation ExcerptRecommendation YearObservation Date
European Committee for the Prevention of Torture and Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (CPT)“The CPT recommends that the management of the Special Home for Accommodation of Foreigners in Lyubimets deliver a clear message to all staff members that the ill-treatment of detained foreign nationals (whether of a physical or verbal nature) is not acceptable and will be the subject of severe sanctions. The Committee also recommends that steps be taken to increase ongoing staff presence inside the accommodation areas, and that serious efforts be made to improve staff’s training in languages and inter-cultural communication.” “the CPT recommends that the management and staff of the Special Home for Accommodation of Foreigners in Lyubimets exercise increased vigilance and make use of all the means at their disposal to prevent inter-detainee violence and intimidation, paying particular attention to ensuring the safety of women and minors who should not share dormitories with unrelated male adult detainees. The Committee would also like to receive information on the outcome of the investigation into the incident referred to above. “ “the CPT recommends that following steps be taken in respect of the Special Home for Accommodation of Foreigners in Lyubimets: - reduce occupancy levels in the dormitories and remove spare beds; - refurbish the detainee accommodation areas, replace or repair the broken furniture (and provide lockable space for personal belongings) and sanitary facilities (toilets, washrooms and showers) and make sure all these premises and installations are properly maintained and kept clean; carry out thorough and repeated disinfestation measures and replace all mattresses with new, insulated and washable ones, so as to eliminate the problem of infestation with bed bugs; - ensure that detained foreign nationals have ready access to a toilet at all times, including at night; - ensure the provision of personal hygiene items, sanitary materials for women, nappies for infants, appropriate clothing and shoes; - provide detained foreign nationals with clear information, in languages they understand, about the procedures to be followed to obtain the above-mentioned items from the Home’s administration. 53 Further, the Committee invites the Bulgarian authorities to review the food arrangements (including as regards baby food) in the Home in order to ensure that the dietary habits and needs of detained foreign nationals are being adequately catered for. Close attention should also be paid to the prices of items sold in the establishment’s shop.” “The CPT calls upon the Bulgarian authorities to offer a range of constructive activities to foreign nationals detained at the Special Home for Accommodation of Foreigners in Lyubimets, taking into consideration the fact that persons may – and often do – spend lengthy periods of time at the establishment. As a first step, TV sets must be repaired (and foreign nationals enabled to watch foreign TV channels), and radio sets, books, magazines, newspapers (in an appropriate range of languages) provided. Further, detained foreign nationals must be offered the possibility to engage in sports and play board games, andminors should have a playground (with toys) at their disposal. As regards the large outdoor area, it should be equipped with a suitable number of shelters against inclement weather.” “The Committee recommends that steps be taken to strengthen the provision of health care to foreign nationals detained at the Special Home for Accommodation of Foreigners in Lyubimets, and in particular to: - ensure that detained foreign nationals have reasonably rapid and free-of-charge access to the doctor and outside specialists, including to dental care and to a gynaecologist, an obstetrician, a paediatrician and a psychiatrist; efforts should also be made to offer to female detainees the possibility to see a female doctor; - ensure appropriate supplies of free-of-charge medication; - provide qualified interpretation in cases when detained foreigners and medical staff cannot communicate with each other; - improve the quality of medical screening upon arrival (include the screening for TB, other transmissible diseases and mental disorders including signs of PTSD), and the quality of the recording of injuries; in this respect, reference is made to the recommendations in paragraph 27 above which apply mutatis mutandis.| “The Committee recommends that the Bulgarian authorities strive to improve the level of psychological assistance to foreign nationals detained at the Special Home for Accommodation of Foreigners in Lyubimets, including the provision of interpretation.” “The CPT recommends that steps be taken to ensure that all detained foreign nationals at the Special Home for Accommodation of Foreigners in Lyubimets are provided with adequate written information in languages they understand. Further, it would be desirable for foreign nationals to receive a written translation in a language they understand of decisions regarding their detention/removal, as well as written and oral information on the modalities and deadlines for appealing against such decisions.” “the Committee reiterates its recommendation that the Bulgarian authorities take steps to extend the system of legal aid to detained foreign nationals, in all phases of the procedure. For indigent foreign nationals, these services should be provided free of charge.” “The CPT recommends that steps be taken to ensure that foreign nationals detained at the Special Home for Accommodation of Foreigners in Lyubimets receive, when necessary, the assistance of qualified interpreters. The use of fellow detainees as interpreters should, in principle, be avoided.” “The Committee recommends that the Bulgarian authorities allow foreign nationals detained at the Special Home for Accommodation of Foreigners in Lyubimets to use the VoIP technologies on a free-of-charge basis to communicate with the outside world.”20172018
Council of Europe Commissioner for Human Rights“138. Any excessive use of force by law enforcement officials in the context of migration at the border or in detention facilities must be fully and effectively investigated and those found responsible must be adequately sanctioned. 139. Concerning detention, the Commissioner calls on the Bulgarian authorities to give up plans to adopt a law providing for the systematic detention of asylum seekers. Practices such as 22 June 2015 REPORT BY NILS MUIŽNIEKS COMMISSIONER FOR HUMAN RIGHTS OF THE COUNCIL OF EUROPE, FOLLOWING HIS VISIT TO BULGARIA FROM 9 TO 11 FEBRUARY 2015, https://rm.coe.int/ref/ CommDH(2015)12 the detention of persons pending the registration of their asylum claims with the SAR should cease immediately. In addition, the Commissioner stresses that asylum seekers in particularly vulnerable situations should not be kept in immigration detention. The Commissioner draws the authorities’ attention to the recently adopted UNHCR Global Strategy on Detention75 . 140. As to detention for the purpose of removal, the Commissioner calls on the Bulgarian authorities to ensure that detention is only used as a last resort, for the shortest possible period of time and on the basis of individual assessments. Alternatives to detention should be considered first. 141. The Commissioner reiterates that migrant children, including those accompanied by their parents, should not be detained under any circumstances as detention is not in their best interests. 142. The Commissioner calls on the Bulgarian authorities to decriminalise irregular crossing of the Bulgarian border by repealing Article 279 of the Criminal Code. Punishing those who are seeking safety in Europe is not acceptable: the Commissioner recalls that these persons are not criminals and should not be treated as such”20152015
European Committee for the Prevention of Torture and Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (CPT)

§35 [...] The CPT must stress once again that deprivation of asylum seekers of their liberty should be resorted to only exceptionally, after a careful examination of each individual case, and should be applied for the shortest possible time; further, the lawfulness of such a measure should be open to challenge before a judicial authority[11]. When asylum seekers are deprived of their liberty as an exceptional measure, they should be kept separately from foreign nationals who have not lodged an application for international protection. The Committee calls upon the Bulgarian authorities to act in accordance with these precepts. In those instances where there are exceptional reasons for depriving an asylum seeker of his/her liberty while awaiting the outcome of his/her application, such reasons should be fully documented.

In this connection, the delegation learned that a new establishment for the temporary placement of foreign nationals was expected to open in 2011 in Lyubimets, near the border with Turkey, and that persons who had applied for asylum might be detained there. The CPT would like to receive detailed information on the new facility (e.g. capacity, structure, categories of persons held, etc.).

39.       The CPT recommends that the management of the Special Home for Temporary Placement of Foreign Nationals in Busmantsi continue to deliver a clear message to all staff members that the ill-treatment of detained persons (whether of a physical or verbal nature) is not acceptable and will be the subject of sanctions.  Further, the Committee recommends that the management and staff exercise increased vigilance and make use of all the means at their disposal to prevent inter-detainee violence and intimidation.

43.       The CPT reiterates the recommendations made in the report on the 2008 visit that steps be taken at the Busmantsi Home to:- ensure occupancy levels in the dormitories which guarantee a minimum of 4 m² per detained person; - restore the broken furniture and sanitary facilities to a good state of repair and provide sufficient funding for running repairs; -  ensure that detained persons have ready access to a toilet at all times, including at night; - review the provision of personal hygiene products and appropriate clothing and footwear to detainees. Further, the Committee invites the Bulgarian authorities to review the food arrangements in the Busmantsi Home in order to ensure that the dietary habits and needs of detained persons are being adequately catered for. It would be useful to involve detainees in the setting up of food menus, to reflect better the range of different dietary habits.

§47  The CPT recommends that steps be taken to strengthen the provision of health care to foreign nationals detained at the Busmantsi Home, and in particular to: reinforce the health-care team by appointing at least one more nurse; ensure that detained persons have unrestricted and reasonably rapid access to the doctor and outside specialists, including to dental care; provide interpretation in cases when medical staff cannot communicate with detained foreign nationals; ensure that detained foreign nationals are fully informed of their treatment.

§48 [...] The Committee recommends that the Bulgarian authorities reinforce the provision of psychological care to foreign nationals detained at the Busmantsi Home.

§ 51 [...] The CPT recommends the Bulgarian authorities seek ways to improve channels of communication between SAR and the Busmantsi Home with a view to better informing detainees of their situation.

§53 [...] The CPT reiterates its recommendation that the Bulgarian authorities take steps to ensure that foreign nationals detained at the Busmantsi Home receive, when necessary, the assistance of qualified interpreters. The use of fellow detainees as interpreters should, in principle, be avoided.

§54 [...] The CPT recommends that the Bulgarian authorities take effective steps to ensure that foreign nationals subject to coercive administrative measures (including those facing expulsion on grounds of national security) benefit from an effective legal remedy enabling them to have the lawfulness of their detention decided speedily before a judicial body. This judicial review should entail an oral hearing with legal assistance, if necessary provided free of charge to the person concerned, and interpretation. Moreover, detained foreign nationals should be expressly informed of this legal remedy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

20122012

Bilateral/multilateral agreements linked to readmission Show sources
NameYear in ForceObservation Date
Lebanon20032018
Armenia20082018
Georgia20032018
Uzbekistan20042018
Kosovo20122018
Hungary19992018
Finland19992018
Hong Kong (EU agreement)20072018
Macao (EU agreement)20072018
Sri Lanka (EU agreement)20072018
Albania (EU agreement)2018
Russia (EU agreement)20072018
Ukraine (EU agreement)20082018
Macedonia (EU agreement)20082018
Bosnia-Herzegovina (EU agreement)2018
Montenegro (EU agreement)20082018
Serbia (EU agreement)20082018
Moldova (EU agreement)20082018
Pakistan (EU agreement)20102018
Georgia (EU agreement)20112018
Cape Verde (EU agreement)20142018
Germany19952017
Germany20062017
Austria19982017
Belgium20052017
Spain19972017
Spain19992017
Estonia20032017
Finland20042017
France19972017
Greece19982017
Ireland20032017
Italy19982017
Latvia20022017
Luxembourg20052017
Netherlands20052017
Poland19942017
Portugal19982017
Romania20002017
Czech Republic19982017
Czech Republic20052017
United Kingdom20042017
Slovakia20072017
Slovenia20002017
Sweden19992017
Norway19992017
Switzerland20092017
Albania20032017
Bosnia and Herzegovina20082017
Croatia20032017
Macedonia20022017
Serbia20102017
Russian Federation20122017
Ukraine20022017

Relevant recommendations of the UN Universal Periodic Review Show sources
Recomendation IssuedYear IssuedObservation Date
No20112017
Yes20152017

Institutions Expand all

Federal or centralized governing system Show sources
Federal or centralized governing systemObservation Date
Centralized system2016
Centralized or decentralized immigration authority Show sources
Centralized or decentralized immigration authorityObservation Date
Centralized immigration authority2016

Custodial authority Show sources
AgencyMinistryMinistry TypologyObservation Date
Migration DirectorateMinistry of the InteriorInterior or Home Affairs2017
State Agency for RefugeesCouncil of MinistersExecutive2016
Migration DirectorateMinistry of the InteriorInterior or Home Affairs2015
Migration DirectorateMinistry of the InteriorInterior or Home Affairs2014
Migration DirectorateMinistry of the InteriorInterior or Home Affairs2013
National Service Border PoliceMinistry of Interior2011
National Service Border PoliceMinistry of InteriorInterior or Home Affairs2011
National Service Border PoliceMinistry of Interior2010
National Service Border PoliceMinistry of InteriorInterior or Home Affairs2010
Detention Facility Management Show sources
Entity NameEntity TypeObservation Date
Migration Directorate. Ministry of Interior.Governmental2013
Formally designated detention estate? Show sources
Formally designated immigration detention estate?Types of officially designated detention centresObservation Date
YesDedicated immigration detention facilities2016
Types of detention facilities used in practice Show sources
Immigration detention centre (Administrative)Immigration field office (Administrative)Transit centre (Administrative)Reception centre (Administrative)Offshore detention centre (Administrative)Hospital (Administrative)Border guard (Administrative)Police station (Criminal)National penitentiary (Criminal)Local prison (Criminal)Juvenile detention centre (Criminal)Informal camp (Ad hoc)Immigration detention centre (Ad hoc)Surge facility (Ad hoc)Observation Date
YesYes2017
Yes2016
2016

Authorized monitoring institutions Show sources
InstitutionInstitution TypeObservation Date
Bulgarian OmbudsmanNational Human Rights Institution (or Ombudsperson) (NHRI)2016
Commission for Protection against DiscriminationNational Human Rights Institution (or Ombudsperson) (NHRI)2016
Ombudsman of the Republic of BulgariaOPCAT National Preventive Mechanism (NPM)2016
Bulgarian Helsinki Committee,Non-Governmental Organizations (NGO)2015
Bulgarian Red CrossNon-Governmental Organizations (NGO)2015
ACET Centre for Torture VictimsNon-Governmental Organizations (NGO)2015
Is the national human rights institution (NHRI) recognized as independent? Show sources
Is the NHRI recognized as independent by the International Coordinating Committee of National Human Rights Institutions?Observation Date
No2017
No2016
Does NHRI carry out visits? Show sources
Does NHRI carry out visits in practice?Observation Date
Yes2017
Yes2016
Does NHRI have capacity to receive complaints? Show sources
Does NHRI have capacity to receive complaints?Observation Date
Yes2017
Yes2016
Does NHRI publicly release reports on immigration detention? Show sources
Does NHRI publicly release reports on immigration detention?Observation Date
Yes2017
Yes2016
Does national preventive mechanism (NPM) carry out visits? Show sources
Does NPM carry out visits in practice?Observation Date
Yes2017
Does NPM have capacity to receive complaints? Show sources
Does NPM have capacity to receive complaints?Observation Date
Yes2017
Yes2016
Does NPM publicly release reports on immigration detention? Show sources
Does NPM publicly release reports on immigration detention?Observation Date
Yes2017
Yes2016
Do NGOs carry out visits? Show sources
Do NGOs regularly carry our visits?Observation Date
Yes2017
Yes2016
NGO capacity to receive complaints? Show sources
NGO capacity to receive complaints?Observation Date
No2017
Do NGOs publish reports on immigration detention? Show sources
Do NGOs publish reports on immigration detention?Observation Date
Yes2017
Yes2016
Do international and/or regional bodies (IRBs) visit immigration-related detention facilities? Show sources
Do international and/or regional bodies (IRB) regularly visit immigration-related detention facilities?Observation Date
infrequently2017
Do IRBs publicly report their findings from inspections? Show sources
Do IRBs publicly report their findings from detention inspections?Observation Date
Yes2017

Types of privatisation/outsourcing Show sources
Types of Privatisation/OutsourcingObservation Date
Food services2017
Facility maintenance2017
Other detention facility or detainee services2017
Detention contractors and other non-state entities Show sources
Name of entityType of entityDetainee transportFood servicesHealth careSocial servicesLaundry servicesLegal counsellingManagementOwner of detention facilityRecreationSecurityTelephone serviceTranslation servicesObservation Date
Aeroklima Bulgaria EOOD (Аероклима Бул ЕООД)For profitYes2017
Ronos OOD (Ронос ООД)For profitYes2017
Perun KKB EOOD (Перун ККБ ЕООД)For profitYes2017
ATC Bulgaria OOD (АТС България ООД)For profitYes2017
Yunis OOD (Юнис ООД)For profitYes2017
Yunis OOD (Юнис ООД)For profitYes2017
Klimatronik EOOD (Климатроник ЕООД)For profitYes2017
Elma Engineering OOD (Елма Инжинеринг ООД)Yes2017
Sektron OOD (Сектрон ООД)Yes2017
S and T Bulgaria EOOD (С & Т България ЕООД)Yes2017
Right Cleaning EOOD (Райт Клийнинг ЕООД)Yes2017
Nove Engineering EOOD (Нове Инжинеринг ЕООД)For profitYes2017
Kukuda group OOD (Кукуда груп ООД)For profitYes2017
SBI Trade EOOD (Си Би Ай Трейд ЕООД)For profitYes2017

Estimated annual budgets for particular detention-related activities Show sources
Individual detention-related activitiesEstimated annual budget (in USD)Observation Date
Not available2017

Does the country receive external sources of funding? Show sources
Benefitted from non-state funding sources?Observation Date
Yes2017
Description of foreign assistance Show sources
Description of non-state assistanceObservation Date
In 2017, 54 039 006, 67 BGN were assigned to the Ministry of Interior by the EU to cope with “the increased migratory pressure”. Currently the Migration Directorate implements the project "Implementation of Coercive Administrative Measures on Third-Country Nationals and Provision of Translation" under the National Program of Bulgaria under the AMIF. The deadline for the contract is October 14, 2018. Funding from the European Union amounts to € 750,000.2017

Socio Economic Data Expand all

Gross Domestic Product per capita (in USD) Show sources
Gross Domestic Product per capita (in USD)Observation Date
7,8512014
7,2962013
Remittances to the country Show sources
Remittances to the country (in millions USD)Observation Date
1,7192014
1,5102011
Remittances from the country Show sources
Remittances from the country (in millions USD)Observation Date
252010
Unemployment Rate Show sources
Unemployment RateObservation Date
11.62014
Human Development Index Ranking (UNDP) Show sources
Human Development Index Ranking (UNDP)UNDP four-tiered rankingObservation Date
59High2015
58High2014

Pew Global Attitudes Poll on Immigration Show sources
% who agree with the statement “We should restrict and control entry of people into our country more than we do now.”Observation Date
532007

Country Links


Additional Resources


Immigration Detention: “Never in the Best Interests of Children”

This past summer, people across the globe watched in outrage as children were forcibly separated from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border and placed in hastily set up camps and cages. Overlooked in much of the criticism, however, was the fact that children are locked behind bars for immigration-related reasons in dozens of other counties across the globe, all of whom—with the notable exception of the United States—have ratified the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Submission to the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child: Bulgaria

Global Detention Project Submission to the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child 72 Session (17 May 2016 – 03 Jun 2016) Consideration of State Report – Bulgaria (Consolidated Third, Fourth and Fifth Periodic Reports) Geneva, 14 April 2016   Issues concerning immigration detention The Global Detention Project (GDP) welcomes the opportunity to provide […]

Immigration Detention in Bulgaria

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