Thailand

No Data

Immigration detainees

200

Detained children

2017

102,245

Refugees

2018

69,800,000

Population

2020

Overview

Thailand hosts more than four million migrants, asylum seekers, and refugees. Officials have broad discretionary powers to place non-citizens in detention and there is no detention time limit. Severe overcrowding is endemic at detention facilities and conditions are reportedly abysmal, including for the thousands of foreign children who are detained annually.

Types of facilities used for migration-related detention
Administrative Ad Hoc Criminal Unknown

11 June 2020

Rohingya Refugees Sit Behind Bars at a Police Station in Satun Province, Thailand, (AP Photo,
Rohingya Refugees Sit Behind Bars at a Police Station in Satun Province, Thailand, (AP Photo, "Thailand: Let UN Refugee Agency Screen Rohingya," 21 May 2020, https://www.hrw.org/news/2020/05/21/thailand-let-un-refugee-agency-screen-rohingya)

In mid-May, the governor of the Tak Province in Thailand issued a warning about the movement of Muslims from Myanmar and Bangladesh entering Thailand, stating that this posed a purported Covid-19-related threat. The announcement stated: “Tak is a province bordering the country of Myanmar that has movements of [migrant] workers, and also the COVID-19 pandemic in Myanmar and Bangladesh is still happening, and patients are still being found. Muslim people from both countries are expected to move to Tak Province.”

The announcement coincided with stepped up efforts in Tak Province to arrest undocumented migrants and refugees. Between 7 May and 1 June, Thai security arrested 35 Rohingya, including six women and 16 children, in the town Mae Sot in Tak Province, at the border of Thailand and Myanmar. They were being held at Tak Immigration Office in Thailand. Thai authorities have denied that the detainees are ethnic Rohingya, instead alleging they are “Myanmar Muslims.” However, the human rights organization Fortify Rights claims to have verified that the 35 people are Rohingya from Myanmar, and had previously travelled overland for approximately one to three months from Rakhine State and camps in Cox’s Bazar before arriving in the country. At least four Rohingya reportedly died en route. Reportedly, brokers collected payments of 500,000 to 900,000 Myanmar Kyat (about US$350 to US$645) for transportation to Malaysia and required some to provide further payments upon arrival in Malaysia.

Human Rights Watch estimates that approximately 200 Rohingya are being held in immigration detention and other facilities across Thailand. In May, it called on the Thai government to allow the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) unhindered access to Rohingya from Myanmar to determine whether they qualify for refugee status. Fortify Rights have called on the Thai government to protect Rohingya refugees from forced return and indefinite detention, and to screen them to determine if they are survivors of trafficking.

On 8 May, Human Rights Watch reported that at least 65 (out of 115) detainees in Thailand’s Songkhla immigration detention center – including 18 ethnic Rohingya women and children – had tested positive for Covid-19. At least 18 of these detainees are refugees who have been detained since 2015. Officials traced the infection cluster to an immigration officer who worked at Sadao border checkpoint and visited the center, who later tested positive for the virus. Songkhla governor Jaruwat Kliangklao said that the infected detainees would be treated until fully recovered before being deported to their respective countries. He said that the detention facility would be turned into a field hospital for the purpose of providing medical treatment to infected detainees.


05 May 2020

Immigration Detainees Stand Behind Bars at an Immigration Detention Centre in Bangkok, (Romeo Gacad, AFP, Getty Images,
Immigration Detainees Stand Behind Bars at an Immigration Detention Centre in Bangkok, (Romeo Gacad, AFP, Getty Images, "Thailand's Outbreak Spike Exposes Conditions in Migration Detention Centre," Thai Enquirer, 30 April 2020, https://www.thaienquirer.com/12519/thailands-outbreak-spike-exposes-conditions-in-migrant-detention-centre/)

As of 4 May 2020, Thailand had recorded 2,987 cases of Covid-19 and 54 deaths related to the disease. Among those with the infection are immigration detainees. On 25 April, 42 detainees in the Sadoa Immigration Detention Centre tested positive. The Immigration Police Chief told the press that 73 migrant detainees (out of a total 115) still had to be tested, including children.

Thailand’s 22 detention centres house “illegal immigrants,” a category that ranges from visitors who have overstayed a 90-day tourist visa, to asylum seekers and refugees. Amnesty International reported that official regulations allow for cell sizes to be a minimum of 1.19 meters per person. According to the NGO Fortify Right, “detention centres were meant for people to stay for 15 days, and then leave. But in Thailand, you can stay there for years, and it’s not designed for that.”

The Global Detention Project previously reported that the length of stay for detainees in Thailand ranges from 3 days to 12 years, with asylum seekers and refugees having been detained for periods of over two years. Several reports of lengthy detention periods originate from Bangkok’s Detention Centre: Suan Phlu. The centre is reported to have the highest number of detainees in the country. While NGOs and detainees maintain that there are over one thousand detainees in the centre, the government has refused to publish official statistics.

A former detainee in Suan Phlu stated that the centre “was so crowded, some of us slept standing up, or in turns. If you turn your legs, you will lose your space.” In addition, detainees have revealed that they are separated by gender and perceived ethnicity: “room 8 for the black people, Room 11 for the brown people.” Certain measures have been put in place to remedy this, including the expansion of Sadao detention centre with a new building and the relocation of certain detainees from the Suan Phlu centre.

While officials maintain that they are conducting widespread testing in detention facilities, other healthcare provisions are limited. Former detainees have said that there is only one nurse in Suan Phlu detention centre. On 25 April, the government stated that detainees, mostly from Myanmar and others from Vietnam, Cambodia and Malaysia, would receive proper treatment in accordance with humanitarian standards.


23 April 2020

A group of civil society organisations issued an open letter on 15 April to the Department of Corrections urging the release of certain categories of prisoners and immigration detainees to address overcrowding. The letter requests that prisoners over the age of 60; sick prisoners; prisoners awaiting trial; prisoners sentenced to terms of up to two years; prisoners detained for immigration offences and pregnant women be prioritised for release.

The same day that the open letter was issued, the Thai Department of Corrections suspended jail sentences for more than 8,000 inmates nationwide to ease overcrowding in prisons during the Covid-19 crisis. The Director-General of the Department of Corrections said that he has sped up the process of granting suspended sentences or cutting the prison term for qualified inmates, including those facing minor offences and/or exhibiting good behaviour. However, no similar measures were announced as regards immigration detainees.

According to advocates in the country that are members of the International Detention Coalition, immigration detention centres remain crowded and detainees at risk of infection, and that authorities have started shifting detainees to different facilities to assist social distancing. The IOM reports that it has been distributing information, education and communication materials in immigration detention centres to help prevent the spread of Covid-19.

The Border Consortium (TBC) released a statement on 2 April 2020 on the impact of Covid-19 on refugees and conflict-affected communities in the country. TBC stated that the 90,000 refugees from Myanmar in the country have become even more marginalised in camps along the Thailand border and that “restrictions on movement in and out of the camps have eroded refugees’ limited opportunities for informal income, making them solely dependent on humanitarian assistance for their essential needs.” Although no Covid-19 cases have been confirmed in the camps, TBC, the Committee for Coordination of Services to Displaced Persons, and UNHCR are coordinating a Covid-19 outbreak response.

TBC is undertaking a series of measures, including:

- Working with suppliers and vendors to ensure a three-month stockpile of rice, tinned fish, cooking oil and charcoal is available in all camps
- Undertaking public awareness campaigns about washing hands thoroughly, maintaining social distance, and other preventative communications have been disseminated in local languages
- Distributing personal protective equipment including face masks, hand gloves, thermometers and handwashing facilities to community health workers.


06 April 2020

Fears of the uncontrolled spread of Covid-19 in Buriam Prison led to protests within the facility, 29 March 2020 (https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2020/03/coronavirus-rumour-sparks-prison-riot-thailand-buriram-200329111845599.html)
Fears of the uncontrolled spread of Covid-19 in Buriam Prison led to protests within the facility, 29 March 2020 (https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2020/03/coronavirus-rumour-sparks-prison-riot-thailand-buriram-200329111845599.html)

Despite severe overcrowding characterising Thailand’s immigration detention facilities, the GDP has been unable to find any reports indicating that authorities have taken steps to protect, or release, immigration detainees.

While the country has drafted measures which remove the need for foreign tourists, stuck in the country due to airline cancellations, to apply for visa extensions, migrant workers in the country must continue to regularly report to immigration authorities. New legislation, meanwhile, requires foreigners entering the country to show medical certificates stating that they have tested negative for Covid-19, as well as evidence of health insurance coverage. Those arriving without such paperwork risk detention and deportation.

All visits to prisons have been suspended from 18 to 31 March 2020. Families can bring money and food to prisoners but may not enter the premises. On 29 March 2020, fears of the virus’s uncontrolled spread within prisons prompted inmates held in Buriram Prison to protest their confinement. During the ensuing violence, several persons escaped.


Last updated: February 2016

Thailand Immigration Detention Profile

Thailand is an important destination for migrant workers and asylum seekers from across the Greater Mekong Delta region as well other parts of Asia. Like many of its neighbours, Thailand is not a signatory to the Refugee Convention and does not have a formal asylum framework in place. Asylum seekers and refugees are generally treated as unauthorized immigrants, charged with crimes, and sent to detention centres. Rohingya Muslims fleeing persecution in Myanmar are particularly vulnerable to arrest and detention as are Christian asylum seekers from Pakistan.[1]

Thailand hosts approximately four million international migrants, an estimated 1.5 million of whom are undocumented.[2] Approximately 80 percent of the migrants and asylum seekers in the country are from Myanmar while the remaining 20 percent come mainly from Laos and Cambodia. The country has undertaken various regularization and registration operations since the early 2000s within the framework of bilateral labour agreements with Laos, Cambodia, and Myanmar. Nearly 1.6 million irregular migrants (including dependents) were registered during a four-month period in 2014.[3]

Despite these regularization exercises, both documented and undocumented migrant workers and asylum seekers remain at risk of arrest, detention, and deportation, as advocacy groups like the Mekong Migration Network have documented.[4] Migration policies in Thailand often lead to confusion and migrant workers live under the constant threat of deportation.[5] This is due to several factors, including dependency on a single employer, costly and complicated bureaucratic procedures, restrictions on freedom movement, as well as police corruption and collusion with traffickers.[6]

Some 110,000 Myanmar refugees have been allowed to stay in nine camps on the Thai-Myanmar border by executive discretion. There is also an unverified number of refugees and asylum seekers from dozens of other countries, who reside outside camps.[7] There are often long delays in processing asylum claims, which for those living outside official refugee camps can mean extended periods in immigration detention while awaiting resettlement.[8]

Thailand’s treatment of Rohingyas has been widely condemned. In 2013, after the Myanmar government refused to accept Rohingyas being deported from Thailand, journalists uncovered a secret Thai Royal Police policy called “option two,” which was reportedly designed “to remove Rohingya refugees from Thailand's immigration detention centres and deliver them to human traffickers waiting at sea.”[9] Reporters interviewed Rohingyas who had been sold to human traffickers by immigration officials and quoted official sources who said that of the two thousand Rohingyas held in Thai detention centres as of early October 2013 only 154 Rohingyas remained in detention some two months later.[10] Since these initial reports were published there have numerous reports by Human Rights Watch (HRW) and others documenting mass graves at camps run by migrant traffickers in Thailand.[11]

More recently, in early 2016, there were numerous reports concering the mistreatment of Christian asylum seekers from Pakistan. A January 2016 article in the Christian Post reported that a 30-year-old Pakistiani Christian woman died in Thai police custody on "Christmas Eve after she was arrested and prevented from taking much needed medications." The article cited a British Pakistani Christian Association that claimed Thai authorities had launched "a crackdown against Pakistani Christians who've overstayed their visas in Thailand." A February 2016 BBC report stated that those arrested in the raids were being charged with "illegal immigration, fined 4,000 Baht (£90), and then sent to Bangkok's Immigration Detention Centre."

The Immigration Act, B.E. 2522 (1979), provides police officers and immigration officials broad discretionary powers to detain foreigners. The law does not set a maximum length of time that a person can remain in administrative immigration detention.

The Immigration Act also criminalizes unauthorized stay, which is punishable by up to two years imprisonment. The Ministry of Justice’s Department of Corrections is responsible for monitoring prison and detention facility conditions, however its mandate does not include administrative detainees. The Immigration Police Bureau of the Royal Thai Police administers the country’s approximately 15 dedicated immigration detention centres (IDCs), which are spread out across Thailand’s land borders and along the Andaman Sea and Gulf of Thailand.[12] The detention centres are not subject to many of the regulations that govern the regular prison system. As a result, both the procedures and conditions of immigration detention can vary greatly.[13]

The costs of deportation are to be covered by the person being deported, a policy that the Global Detention Project has found common in other countries as well (for example, in Lebanon and Egypt). In addition, as in Australia,[14] immigration detainees in Thailand have to pay for the cost of detention, leading to an increased likelihood of lengthy or indefinite detention.[15] Human rights groups have emphasized that this is a discriminatory practice that contravenes international human rights norms and standards.[16]

Although there are no official statistics on the numbers of people placed in immigration detention, human rights groups have attempted to document the prevalence of certain practices, like the detention of children. According to HRW, “approximately 100 children per year are detained on a long-term basis (that is, for a period of longer than one month). Meanwhile, at least 4,000 children are thought to move through the immigration detention system each year for shorter periods (days or weeks).”[17]

In 2012, the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child reminded Thailand that children should only be deprived of liberty as a last resort and for as short a time as possible. The committee also underscored that when children are detained they must be confined separately from adults and in “a safe, child sensitive environment” that enables regular contact with their families.” The committee urged Thailand to “Promote alternative measures to detention such as diversion, probation, counselling, community service or suspended sentences, wherever possible.”[18]

According to a 2014 Amnesty International report, official regulations in Thailand allow for cell sizes in detention centres to be a minimum of 1.19 metres per person,  “which does not allow detainees to lie down to sleep.”[19] HRW has also reported on the abysmal conditions in detention centres, “including severe overcrowding, putrid sanitation, and an atmosphere of violence.” Detainees have repeatedly complained of overcrowding and extremely poor hygiene. In 2013, journalists found 276 male Rohingyas detained in two small “cages” meant to hold no more than 15 people at the Phang Nga detention centre on the coast of the Strait of Malacca.[20] At the time, Thai authorities acknowledged that they were “aware of the overcrowding issue at the existing immigration facilities” and that alternative arrangements were being made. According to the journalists, the head of Thailand’s parliamentary Border Affairs Committee commented that “The conditions you have seen would even be difficult for animals.”

International agencies and organisations have been given access to immigration detention centres (IDCs), including the International Organisation for Migration (IOM), which carried out “The first immunization programme for Myanmar Muslims from Rakhine State and Bangladeshis in all IDCs and Shelters” in October 2015. According to an IOM report, “Myanmar Muslims from Rakhine State in Phang-Nga IDC conducted two series of hunger strikes to express their frustration at their period of detention.”[21] Human Rights Watch has asked IOM to provide more reports immigration detention in Thailand and urged UNHCR officials to “intervene promptly to seek the immediate release of refugees and asylum seekers when they are arrested.”[22]

 

[1] United Nations High Commissionner for Refugees. 2015 UNHCR country operations profile – Thailand. http://www.unhcr.org/pages/49e489646.html; BBC, "The Christians held in Thailand after fleeing Pakistan," 26 February 2016, http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-35654804. 

[2] Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division, United Nations, International Migration 2015 Wallchart, http://www.un.org/en/development/desa/population/publications/http://www.un.org/en/development/desa/population/publications/migration/migration-wallchart-2013.shtml, United Nations, 20135.

[3] International Labour Organization (ILO). Review of the effectiveness of the MOUs in managing labour migration between Thailand and neighbouring countries. Tripartite Action to Protect the Rights of Migrant Workers within and from the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS TRIANGLE project). Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific. 2015. http://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/---asia/---ro-bangkok/documents/publication/wcms_356542.pdf

[4] Mekong Migration Network, Website, "Arrest, Detention, and Deportation," http://www.mekongmigration.org/?page_id=126.

[5] International Labour Organization (ILO). Review of the effectiveness of the MOUs in managing labour migration between Thailand and neighbouring countries. Tripartite Action to Protect the Rights of Migrant Workers within and from the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS TRIANGLE project). Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific. 2015. http://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/---asia/---ro-bangkok/documents/publication/wcms_356542.pdf

[6] International Labour Organization (ILO). Review of the effectiveness of the MOUs in managing labour migration between Thailand and neighbouring countries. Tripartite Action to Protect the Rights of Migrant Workers within and from the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS TRIANGLE project). Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific. 2015. http://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/---asia/---ro-bangkok/documents/publication/wcms_356542.pdf

[7] United Nations High Commissionner for Refugees. UNHCR's new biometrics system helps verify 110,000 Myanmar refugees in Thailand. 30 June 2015. http://www.unhcr.org/55926d646.html

[8] United Nations High Commissionner for Refugees. 2015 UNHCR country operations profile – Thailand. http://www.unhcr.org/pages/49e489646.html

[9] Jason Szep and Andrew R.C. Marshall. Special Report - Thailand secretly dumps Myanmar refugees into trafficking rings. Reuters. 5 December 2013. http://uk.reuters.com/article/2013/12/05/uk-thailand-rohingya-special-report-idUKBRE9B400920131205

[10] Jason Szep and Andrew R.C. Marshall. Special Report - Thailand secretly dumps Myanmar refugees into trafficking rings. Reuters. 5 December 2013. http://uk.reuters.com/article/2013/12/05/uk-thailand-rohingya-special-report-idUKBRE9B400920131205

[11] Human Rights Watch, “Thailand: Mass Graves of Rohingya Found in Trafficking Camp,” 1 May 2015, https://www.hrw.org/news/2015/05/01/thailand-mass-graves-rohingya-found-trafficking-camp.

[12] Mekong Migration Network. Arrest, Detention and Deportation. Map of IDCs. 2012. http://mekongmigration.org/add/?page_id=33

[13] United States Department of State. Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 2014. http://www.state.gov/j/drl/rls/hrrpt/humanrightsreport/#wrapper

[14] Beyderwellen & Company. Removal from Australia. http://www.beyderwellen.com/immigration-practice-areas/unlawful.htm

[15] Immigration Act, B.E. 2522 (enacted on 24 February 1979, amended in 1992) Sections 54 and 55. Thailand Law Forum. http://www.thailawforum.com/database1/immigration-law-mejesty.html

[16] Human Rights Watch. Two Years With No Moon Immigration Detention of Children in Thailand. 1 September 2014. https://www.hrw.org/report/2014/09/01/two-years-no-moon/immigration-detention-children-thailand

[17] Human Rights Watch. Two Years With No Moon Immigration Detention of Children in Thailand. 1 September 2014. https://www.hrw.org/report/2014/09/01/two-years-no-moon/immigration-detention-children-thailand

[18] Committee on the Rights of the Child. Consideration of reports submitted by States parties under article 44 of the Convention. Concluding observations: Thailand. CRC/C/THA/CO/3-4. 17 February 2012. http://uhri.ohchr.org/document/index/976dcd33-b7f5-4d94-b473-cb4c07d99275

[19] Amnesty International, “Thailand: submission to the United Nations Committee against Torture,” 52nd Session, 28 April – 23 may 2014, ASA 39/003/2014.

[20] Sparks, John. The plight of Burma's Rohingya Muslims in a Thai Camp. World News Blog. Channel 4. 31 May 2013. http://blogs.channel4.com/world-news-blog/the-plight-of-burmas-rohingya-muslims-in-a-thai-camp/24226

[21] International Organisation for Migration, “Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea Crisis - Situation Report October 2015.”

[22] Human Rights Watch. Two Years With No Moon Immigration Detention of Children in Thailand. 1 September 2014. https://www.hrw.org/report/2014/09/01/two-years-no-moon/immigration-detention-children-thailand

IMMIGRATION AND DETENTION-RELATED STATISTICS

Number of detained asylum seekers
200
2015
Total number of detained minors
200
2017
4,000
2014
Number of dedicated long-term immigration detention centres
14
2012
Criminal prison population
291,794
2017
296,577
2014
200,280
2010
168,656
2007
167,142
2004
250,903
2001
164,451
1998
111,028
1995
73,309
1992
Percentage of foreign prisoners
4.6
2016
Prison population rate (per 100,000 of national population)
431
2017
290
2010
249
2007
253
2004
393
2001
267
1998
186
1995
126
1992
Population
69,800,000
2020
67,401,000
2014
International migrants
3,913,300
2015
4,000,000
2014
3,721,700
2013
International migrants as a percentage of the population
5.8
2015
5.6
2013
Estimated number of undocumented migrants
1,400,000 - 1,500,000
2014
Refugees
102,245
2018
104,615
2017
106,426
2016
110,372
2015
136,499
2014
130,328
2014
84,479
2012
Ratio of refugees per 1000 inhabitants
1.56
2016
1.92
2014
1.27
2012
1.3
2011
Total number of new asylum applications
2,585
2016
3,109
2012
12,958
2011
Refugee recognition rate
66.4
2014
Stateless persons
478,843
2018
486,440
2017
487,741
2016
506,197
2014
506,197
2012
Total number of immigration detainees by year
Number of immigration detainees on a given day
Top nationalities of detainees
Number of persons granted alternatives to immigration detention
Number of detained unaccompanied minors
Number of detained accompanied minors
Number of detained stateless persons
Number of apprehensions of non-citizens
Immigration detainees as a percentage of total international migrant population
Estimated total immigration detention capacity
Estimated capacity of dedicated long-term immigration detention centres
Number of dedicated medium-term immigration detention centres
Number of immigration offices
Number of transit facilities
Number of criminal facilities
Number of ad hoc facilities
Number of persons removed/returned (voluntary returns and deportations)
Number of deportations/forced returns only
Percentage of persons removed in relation to total number of people placed in removal procedures

SOCIO-ECONOMIC INDICATORS

Gross Domestic Product per capita (in USD)
5,977
2014
5,779
2013
5,480
2012
Remittances to the country
5,655
2014
3,994
2011
Remittances from the country
2,397
2010
Unemployment Rate
2014
2009
Net official development assistance (ODA) (in millions USD)
351.2
2014
Human Development Index Ranking (UNDP)
93 (High)
2015
89 (High)
2014
103 (Medium)
2012
World Bank Rule of Law Index
50 (-0.7)
2012
49 (-1.1)
2011
49 (-0.7)
2010
Unemployment rate amongst migrants
Detention for deterrence
Pew Global Attitudes Poll on Immigration
Immigration Index Score
Domestic Opinion Polls on Immigration

DOMESTIC LAWS AND POLICIES

Legal tradition
Civil law
Constitutional guarantees?
(Constitution of the Kingdom of Thailand (Interim), Buddhist Era 2557 (2014) assented to by King Bhumibol Adulyadej in June 2014. To be submitted to a referendum in 2015.) 2014 2014
2014
Core pieces of national legislation
Anti-Trafficking in Persons Act, B. E. 2551 (2008) (2008) 2008
2008
Immigration Act, B.E. 2522 (1979) (1979) 1979
1979
Additional legislation
Criminal Procedure Code of Thailand B.E. 2477 - 1934 () 2008
Regulations, standards, guidelines
Immigration Order 148/2553 (18 August 2010) on Standards in Immigration Detention Centres (2010)
2010
Immigration Order 21/2545 on Regulations and Measures Regarding the Receiving and Detention of an Alleged Offender or a Detainee ()
Immigration-status-related grounds
Detention to prevent unauthorised entry at the border
2015
Detention to effect removal
2015
Detention for unauthorised entry or stay
2015
Does the country provide specific criminal penalties for immigration-related violations?
Yes (Yes)
2015
Grounds for criminal immigration-related detention/incarceration and maximum potential duration of incarceration
Unauthorised stay (730)
2015
Maximum length for administrative immigration detention in law.
No Limit
2015
Longest recorded instance of immigration detention.
4380
2014
Maximum length of time in custody prior to issuance of a detention order
7
2015
Maximum length of detention for asylum-seekers
No Limit
2013
Provision of basic procedural standards
Access to asylum procedures (No)
2015
Information to detainees (Yes)
2013
Access to consular assistance (Yes) No
2013
Independent review of detention (No) No
2013
Complaints mechanism regarding detention conditions (Yes)
2013
Access to free interpretation services (No) No
2013
Types of non-custodial measures
Supervised release and/or reporting (Yes) infrequently
2015
Release on bail (Yes) infrequently
2015
Is the detention of vulnerable persons provided in law? Are they detained in practice?
Victims of trafficking (Provided)
2015
Asylum seekers (Not mentioned) Yes
2015
Refugees (Not mentioned) Yes
2015
Accompanied minors (Provided) Yes
2014
Unaccompanied minors (Provided) Yes
2014
Stateless persons (Not mentioned) Yes
2014
Non-immigration-status-related grounds providing for administrative detention in immigration legislation.
Has the country decriminalized immigration-related violations?
Average length of detention
Maximum length of detention for persons detained upon arrival at ports of entry
Impact of alternatives
Mandatory detention
Expedited/fast track removal
Re-entry ban

INTERNATIONAL LAW

Individual complaints procedure
Acceptance Year
CRC, [Third] Optional Protocol to the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child establishing a communications procedure, 2011 2012
2012
CEDAW, Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women, 1999 2000
2000
Ratio of complaints procedures accepted
Observation Date
2/7
2/7
Relevant recommendations issued by treaty bodies
Recommendation Year
Human Rights Committee § 30. The State party should: (a) Refrain from detaining refugees, asylum seekers and migrants and implement alternatives to detention, including before deportation. In cases where the individual is detained, the State party should ensure that the detention is based on individual circumstances that are reasonable, necessary and proportionate, and that the cases are reassessed over time. There should also be effective access to judicial review; (b) Ensure that children are not deprived of liberty except as a measure of last resort and for the shortest appropriate period of time, taking into account their best interests as a primary concern, and that they are segregated from adult detainees who are not their family members; (c) Ensure that the living conditions in immigration detention centres are in compliance with the Covenant. 2016
2016
Committee on the Rights of the Child §71"the Committee recommends that the State party treat the asylum-seekers and refugees according to their status and do not subject them to detention or deportations to a country where their lives might be in danger. In this regard, the Committee encourages the State party to seek technical assistance from the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). The Committee also recommends that the State party ratify the 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees and its 1967 Protocol and establish a national legal and institutional framework for protection of refugees." § 80 [...] (a) Raise the minimum age of criminal responsibility to an internationally acceptable age and in no circumstances below the age of 12 years; (b) Ensure that children deprived of liberty are held in detention only as a last resort and for as short a time as possible and that their detention is carried out in compliance with the law; (c) Ensure that children are detained separately from adults as recommended by the Working Group under the universal periodic review, that they have a safe, child sensitive environment and that they maintain regular contact with their families; (d)Promote alternative measures to detention such as diversion, probation, counselling, community service or suspended sentences, wherever possible;" 2012
2012
Regional legal instruments
Year of Ratification (Treaty) / Transposed (Directive) / Adoption (Regulation)
ASEAN CATPWC Convention Against Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children 2016
2016
Bilateral/multilateral agreements linked to readmission
Year in Force
Observation Date
Myanmar 2009
2009
2009
Cambodia 2003
2003
2003
Visits by special procedures of the Human Rights Council
Year of Visit
Observation Date
Special Rapporteur on trafficking in persons, especially in women and children 2011
2011
2012
Relevant recommendations by UN Special Procedures
Recommendation Year
Observation Date
Special Rapporteur on trafficking in persons, especially in women and children "72. [...] corruption in law enforcement, particularly at the provincial and local levels, is deep rooted and has diluted the efficacy of Government policies and programmes in combating human trafficking. As a result, many trafficked persons are not properly identified, leading to cases of wanton arrest, detention and deportation throughout the country [...] §74 [---] The Special Rapporteur has serious concerns that the stay in the shelters amounts to detention and, in addition to infringing fundamental human rights relating to freedom of movement and protection from arbitrary detention, presents a risk to the well-being of trafficked persons [...] §77(p) "ensure that raids and rescue operations are victim-centred and do not cause any discriminatory impact on victims and those who are not victims of trafficking. upon being rescued, trafficked persons should be provided with information about their rights and appropriate counsel ling in a language they understand. further more , in accordance with the a nti-trafficking in persons act, victims should not be criminalized or penalized, including through detention for status-related offences such as violations of immigration laws and other crimes that directly result from their situations as trafficked persons ; 2012
2012
2012
Relevant recommendations of the UN Universal Periodic Review
Observation Date
Yes 2016
2017
Yes 2011
Ratio of relevant international treaties ratified
International treaty reservations
Treaty bodies decisions on individual complaints
Regional treaty reservations
Regional judicial decisions on individual complaints
Recommendations issued by regional human rights mechanisms

INSTITUTIONAL INDICATORS

Federal or centralized governing system
Centralized system
2015
Centralized or decentralized immigration authority
Centralized immigration authority
2015
Custodial authority
"Competent Officials" including from Immigration Bureau, Royal Thai Police and National Security Officials (Ministry of Interior) Interior or Home Affairs
2015
The Immigration Bureau of the Royal Thai Police (Interior Ministry) Interior or Home Affairs
2014
Immigration Bureau of the Royal Thai Police (Interior Ministry) Interior or Home Affairs
2014
The Immigration Bureau of the Royal Thai Police (Interior Ministry) Interior or Home Affairs
2013
"Competent Officials" including from Immigration Bureau, Royal Thai Police and National Security Officials (Interior Ministry) Interior or Home Affairs
2013
Immigration Bureau of the Royal Thai Police (Interior Ministry) Interior or Home Affairs
2013
The Immigration Bureau of the Royal Thai Police (Interior Ministry) Interior or Home Affairs
2012
Immigration Bureau (Ministry of Interior) Interior or Home Affairs
2007
Immigration Bureau (Ministry of Interior) Interior or Home Affairs
2006
Immigration Bureau (Ministry of Interior) Interior or Home Affairs
2005
Immigration Bureau (Ministry of Interior) Interior or Home Affairs
2004
Detention Facility Management
Immigration Bureau, reporting to Royal Thai Police (Governmental)
2013
Sub-Division 3, Investigation Division Immigration Bureau (Governmental)
2013
Sub-Division 3, Investigation Division Immigration Bureau (Governmental)
2012
Ministry of Interior/Immigration Police Bureau (Governmental)
2007
Ministry of Interior/Immigration Police Bureau (Governmental)
2006
Ministry of Interior/Immigration Police Bureau (Governmental)
2005
Ministry of Interior/Immigration Police Bureau (Governmental)
2004
Ministry of Interior / Immigration Police Bureau (Governmental)
2004
Authorized monitoring institutions
UNHCR (International or Regional Bodies (IRBs))
2015
Jesuit Refugee Service Thailand (Non-Governmental Organizations (NGO))
2015
Do NGOs carry out visits?
Yes
2015
Apprehending authorities
Formally designated detention estate?
Types of detention facilities used in practice
Is the national human rights institution (NHRI) recognized as independent?
Does NHRI carry out visits?
Does NHRI have capacity to receive complaints?
Does NHRI publicly release reports on immigration detention?
Does national preventive mechanism (NPM) carry out visits?
Does NPM have capacity to receive complaints?
Does NPM publicly release reports on immigration detention?
NGO capacity to receive complaints?
Do NGOs publish reports on immigration detention?
Do parliamentary organs carry out visits?
Do parliamentary organs have capacity to receive complaints?
Do parliamentary organs publicly report on their detention findings?
Do internal inspection agencies (IIAs) carry out visits?
Do IIAs have capacity to receive complaints?
Do IIAs publicly report their findings from detention inspections?
Do international and/or regional bodies (IRBs) visit immigration-related detention facilities?
Do IRBs publicly report their findings from inspections?
Types of privatisation/outsourcing
Detention contractors and other non-state entities
Estimated annual budget for detention operations
Estimated annual budgets for particular detention-related activities
Estimated cost per detainees day (in USD)
Estimated annual budget for non-custodial measures (in USD)
Estimated costs of non-custodial measures (in USD)
Does the country receive external sources of funding?
Description of foreign assistance