Submission to the Universal Periodic Review: Lebanon

An estimated 73 percent of Syrian refugees in Lebanon lack legal status, limiting their access to services and rendering them vulnerable to abuse. In this submission to the UPR, the GDP highlights the country’s discriminatory treatment of refugees – as well as its policies vis a vis migrant domestic workers – and suggests various recommendations that the UPR Working Group should consider proposing. […]

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Lebanon Immigration Detention Data Profile (2020)

Lebanon Data Profile (2020) The latest detention-related data from Lebanon, including immigration and detention-related statistics, domestic laws and policies, international law, and institutional indicators. View the Lebanon Detention Data Profile Related Reading: Lebanon: Submission to the Universal Periodic Review (37th Session, January/February 2021) – Issues Related to Immigration Detention Report: Immigration Detention in Lebanon – […]

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Immigration Detention in Lebanon: Deprivation of Liberty at the Frontiers of Global Conflict

Immigration detention in Lebanon: Although Lebanon does not consider itself a country of asylum, it has the world’s highest per-capita concentration of refugees, most of whom have fled conflict in neighbouring Syria. Refugees are increasingly treated as a security threat and economic burden, and they have found themselves under growing surveillance and restrictions. The country is […]

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Kidnapped, Trafficked, Detained? The Implications of Non-state Actor Involvement in Immigration Detention

This article critically assesses a range of new non-state actors who have become involved in the deprivation of liberty of migrants and asylum seekers, describes the various forces that appear to be driving their engagement, and makes a series of recommendations concerning the role of non-state actors and detention in global efforts to manage international migration. […]

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Detention Norms and Lebanon

On 17 November Izabella Majcher gave a training session titled “Freedom of Movement and Restrictions thereof, including Detention” as part of the International Refugee Law Course for Lebanese officials organized by the International Institute of Humanitarian Law and UNHCR in Sanremo, Italy. […]

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There and Back Again: On the Diffusion of Immigration Detention

From Mexico to the Bahamas, Mauritania to Lebanon, Turkey to Saudi Arabia, South Africa to Indonesia, Malaysia to Thailand, immigration-related detention has become an established policy apparatus that counts on dedicated facilities and burgeoning institutional bureaucracies. Until relatively recently, however, detention appears to have been largely an ad hoc tool, employed mainly by wealthy states in exigent circumstances. This paper uses concepts from diffusion theory to detail the history of key policy events in several important immigration destination countries that led to the spreading of detention practices during the last 30 years and assesses some of the motives that appear to have encouraged this phenomenon. […]

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Michael Flynn on the Diffusion of Immigration Detention