Critiquing Zones of Exception: Actor-Oriented Approaches Explaining the Rise of Immigration Detention

Immigration policy has catapulted to the forefront of public debate around the world as governments resort to increasingly restrictive measures to block migrants and refugees. While severe border policies are by no means new, this surge in migration control raises questions about the forces driving national policies. This chapter in the new book Immigration Policy in the Age of Punishment advances an actor-oriented analysis that views detention systems as complex organisations that rely on deeply rooted institutional structures to buttress their existence, multiple sources of financing to grow operations, and support from a broad array of social actors. […]

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Spatial Control: Geographical Approaches to the Study of Immigration Detention – Global Detention Project Working Paper No. 24

This paper surveys research on immigration detention conducted using geographical methods, highlighting how geography’s conceptualization of detention as a form of spatial control offers tools to scholars and activists working to contest this form of immigration control. […]

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Kidnapped, Trafficked, Detained? The Implications of Non-state Actor Involvement in Immigration Detention

This article critically assesses a range of new non-state actors who have become involved in the deprivation of liberty of migrants and asylum seekers, describes the various forces that appear to be driving their engagement, and makes a series of recommendations concerning the role of non-state actors and detention in global efforts to manage international migration. […]

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Statement to the Working Group on the Use of Mercenaries Panel on “PMSCs in places of deprivation of liberty and their impact on human rights”

Statement to the Working Group on the Use of Mercenaries Panel on “PMSCs in places of deprivation of liberty and their impact on human rights” Michael Flynn, Global Detention Project 27 April 2017   I am the Director of the Global Detention Project, a research center based in Geneva that documents the use of detention […]

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Briefing on Multi-national Companies that Provide Immigration Detention Services

The UN Working Group on the Use of Mercenaries plans to include an assessment of human rights challenges posed by the operations of private security companies in detention centres and prisons in its 2017 report to the UN General Assembly. To assist in the Working Group’s preparatory work, the GDP provided a briefing on various […]

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GDP Briefing to UN Working Group on the Use of Mercenaries

The GDP’s executive director gave a briefing to the UN Working Group on the Use of Mercenaries on the key multinational corporations that operate immigration detention centres around. The Working Group intends to include this issue in its 2017 report to the UN General Assembly report. Information about the list of companies discussed during the […]

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Human Rights, Business, and Immigration Detention

HUMAN RIGHTS, BUSINESS AND IMMIGRATION DETENTION Parallel event at the 32nd session of the Human Rights Council Thursday 16 June 2016, 2:00pm – 3:00 pm ROOM IV, PALAIS DES NATIONS, Geneva SPEAKERS Surya Deva, UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights Michael Flynn, Global Detention Project (Switzerland) Brynn O’Brien, No Business in Abuse (Australia) […]

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Sovereign Discomfort: Can Liberal Norms Lead to Increasing Immigration Detention?

Liberal democracies betray discomfort at public scrutiny of immigration detention, neglecting to release statistics, cloaking detention in misleading names, and limiting what they define as deprivation of liberty. These countries have also expanded their detention activities and encourageed their neighbors to do the same. What explains this simultaneous reticence towards and embrace of detention?

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Who Is Responsible for Harm in Immigration Detention? Models of Accountability for Private Corporations

This paper argues that private corporations can and should be held responsible for structural injustices that take place in immigration detention regimes in which they operate. It draws on literature from business ethics to evaluate various ethical arguments for assessing corporate responsibility, emphasising models that may lead to the prevention of harm and suffering. In […]

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